No association between vitamin C and E supplementation and grip strength over 5 years: the Colaus study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_18231443B180
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
No association between vitamin C and E supplementation and grip strength over 5 years: the Colaus study.
Périodique
European journal of nutrition
Auteur(s)
Fingeret M., Vollenweider P., Marques-Vidal P.
ISSN
1436-6215 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1436-6207
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
03/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
58
Numéro
2
Pages
609-617
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
To assess the cross-sectional and longitudinal association between self-reported vitamin C + E dietary supplementation and markers of grip strength and frailty in community-dwelling Swiss adults.
Population-based study including 3277 participants (1722 women) aged 40-80 years at baseline. The associations between vitamin C + E dietary supplementation and grip strength were examined cross-sectionally and after a follow-up of 5.2 years on average.
There were 253 (7.7%) self-reported vitamin C + E supplement users. Female users had significantly lower grip strength than non-users (average ± standard deviation: 24.3 ± 6.1 versus 25.6 ± 6.1 kg, respectively). However, the association disappeared after multivariate adjustment (24.7 ± 0.5 versus 25.6 ± 0.1 kg, for users versus non-users, respectively). No differences were found in men regarding grip strength. No differences were found in the highest quintile of grip strength or prevalence of low grip strengthin in users versus non-users during cross-sectional analysis for both genders. After 5.2 years of follow-up, no associations were found between vitamin C + E supplementation and change in grip strength for raw values (difference between baseline and follow-up: 1.2 ± 5.0 versus 0.4 ± 5.2 kg for female and 0.6 ± 6.5 versus 1.1 ± 6.8 kg for male users and non-users, respectively) or after multivariable adjustment (1.2 ± 0.5 versus 0.4 ± 0.1 kg for female and 0.6 ± 0.8 versus 1.1 ± 0.2 kg for male users and non-users, respectively) when taking baseline vitamin C + E supplementation into account. No association was also found for incidence of low grip strength.
In a sample of community-dwelling Swiss adults, vitamin C + E supplementation neither improved grip strength nor prevented low-grip strength over a 5-year period.
Mots-clé
Dietary supplementation, Epidemiology, Low-grip strength, Multivitamins, Prospective, Switzerland
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
03/03/2018 14:02
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:48
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