Imaging of cavitary necrosis in complicated childhood pneumonia.

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: serval:BIB_15980795771F.P001 (810.13 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: de l'auteur
Licence: Non spécifiée
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ID Serval
serval:BIB_15980795771F
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Imaging of cavitary necrosis in complicated childhood pneumonia.
Périodique
European radiology
Auteur(s)
Hodina M., Hanquinet S., Cotting J., Schnyder P., Gudinchet F.
ISSN
0938-7994
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2002
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Numéro
2
Pages
391-6
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article - Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The aim of this study was to illustrate the chest radiographs (CR) and CT imaging features and sequential findings of cavitary necrosis in complicated childhood pneumonia. Among 30 children admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit for persistent or progressive pneumonia, respiratory distress or sepsis despite adequate antibiotic therapy, a study group of 9 children (5 girls and 4 boys; mean age 4 years) who had the radiographic features and CT criteria for cavitary necrosis complicated pneumonia was identified. The pathogens identified were Streptococcus pneumoniae( n=4), Aspergillus( n=2), Legionella( n=1), and Staphylococcus aureus( n=1). Sequential CR and CT scans were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up CR and CT were evaluated for persistent abnormalities. Chest radiographs showed consolidations in 8 of the 9 patients. On CT examination, cavitary necrosis was localized to 1 lobe in 2 patients and 7 patients showed multilobar or bilateral areas of cavitary necrosis. In 3 patients of 9, the cavitary necrosis was initially shown on CT and visualization by CR was delayed by a time span varying from 5 to 9 days. In all patients with cavities, a mean number of five cavities were seen on antero-posterior CR, contrasting with the multiple cavities seen on CT. Parapneumonic effusions were shown by CR in 3 patients and in 5 patients by CT. Bronchopleural fistulae were demonstrated by CT alone ( n=3). No purulent pericarditis was demonstrated. The CT scan displayed persistent residual pneumatoceles of the left lower lobe in 2 patients. Computed tomography is able to define a more specific pattern of abnormalities than conventional CR in children with necrotizing pneumonia and allows an earlier diagnosis of this rapidly progressing condition. Lung necrosis and cavitation may also be associated with Aspergillus or Legionella pneumonia in the pediatric population.
Mots-clé
Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Lung, Male, Necrosis, Pneumonia, Pneumonia, Pneumococcal, Radiography, Thoracic, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
08/04/2008 15:38
Dernière modification de la notice
01/10/2019 7:16
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