Perceptions of twelve-step mutual-help groups and their associations with motivation, treatment attendance and alcohol outcomes among chronically homeless individuals with alcohol problems.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_15903ED96596
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Perceptions of twelve-step mutual-help groups and their associations with motivation, treatment attendance and alcohol outcomes among chronically homeless individuals with alcohol problems.
Périodique
International Journal on Drug Policy
Auteur(s)
Grazioli V.S., Collins S.E., Daeppen J.B., Larimer M.E.
ISSN
1873-4758 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0955-3959
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
26
Numéro
5
Pages
468-474
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
BACKGROUND: Twelve-step mutual-help groups (TMGs) are among the most available forms of support for homeless individuals with alcohol problems. Qualitative research, however, has suggested that this population often has negative perceptions of these groups, which has been shown to be associated with low TMG attendance. It is important to understand this population's perceptions of TMGs and their association with alcohol outcomes to provide more appropriate and better tailored programming for this multiply affected population. The aims of this cross-sectional study were to (a) qualitatively examine perception of TMGs in this population and (b) quantitatively evaluate its association with motivation, treatment attendance and alcohol outcomes.
METHODS: Participants (N=62) were chronically homeless individuals with alcohol problems who received single-site Housing First within a larger evaluation study. Perceptions of TMGs were captured using an open-ended item. Quantitative outcome variables were created from assessments of motivation, treatment attendance and alcohol outcomes.
RESULTS: Findings indicated that perceptions of TMGs were primarily negative followed by positive and neutral perceptions, respectively. There were significant, positive associations between perceptions of TMGs and motivation and treatment attendance, whereas no association was found for alcohol outcomes.
CONCLUSIONS: Although some individuals view TMGs positively, alternative forms of help are needed to engage the majority of chronically homeless individuals with alcohol problems.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
22/05/2015 17:43
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:44
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