The quorum sensing volatile molecule 2-amino acetophenon modulates host immune responses in a manner that promotes life with unwanted guests.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_15059525A721
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
The quorum sensing volatile molecule 2-amino acetophenon modulates host immune responses in a manner that promotes life with unwanted guests.
Périodique
Plos Pathogens
Auteur(s)
Bandyopadhaya A., Kesarwani M., Que Y.A., He J., Padfield K., Tompkins R., Rahme L.G.
ISSN
1553-7374 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1553-7366
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2012
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
8
Numéro
11
Pages
e1003024
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Résumé
Increasing evidence indicates that bacterial quorum sensing (QS) signals are important mediators of immunomodulation. However, whether microbes utilize these immunomodulatory signals to maintain infection remain unclear. Here, we show that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS-regulated molecule 2-amino acetophenone (2-AA) modulates host immune responses in a manner that increases host ability to cope with this pathogen. Mice treated with 2-AA prior to infection had a 90% survival compared to 10% survival rate observed in the non-pretreated infected mice. Whilst 2-AA stimulation activates key innate immune response pathways involving mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), nuclear factor (NF)-κB, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, it attenuates immune response activation upon pretreatment, most likely by upregulating anti-inflammatory cytokines. 2-AA host pretreatment is characterized by a transcriptionally regulated block of c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK) and NF-κB activation, with relatively preserved activation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. These kinase changes lead to CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-β (c/EBPβ) activation and formation of the c/EBPβ-p65 complex that prevents NF-κB activation. 2-AA's aptitude for dampening the inflammatory processes while increasing host survival and pathogen persistence concurs with its ability to signal bacteria to switch to a chronic infection mode. Our results reveal a QS immunomodulatory signal that promotes original aspects of interkingdom communication. We propose that this communication facilitates pathogen persistence, while enabling host tolerance to infection.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
13/12/2012 12:00
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:43
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