Gastroschisis - what should be told to parents?

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_1449AF23387A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Gastroschisis - what should be told to parents?
Périodique
Prenatal Diagnosis
Auteur(s)
Lepigeon K., Van Mieghem T., Vasseur Maurer S., Giannoni E., Baud D.
ISSN
1097-0223 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0197-3851
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
34
Numéro
4
Pages
316-326
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Document Type: Review, pdf : review
Résumé
Gastroschisis is a common congenital abdominal wall defect. It is almost always diagnosed prenatally thanks to routine maternal serum screening and ultrasound screening programs. In the majority of cases, the condition is isolated (i.e. not associated with chromosomal or other anatomical anomalies). Prenatal diagnosis allows for planning the timing, mode and location of delivery. Controversies persist concerning the optimal antenatal monitoring strategy. Compelling evidence supports elective delivery at 37 weeks' gestation in a tertiary pediatric center. Cesarean section should be reserved for routine obstetrical indications. Prognosis of infants with gastroschisis is primarily determined by the degree of bowel injury, which is difficult to assess antenatally. Prenatal counseling usually addresses gastroschisis issues. However, parental concerns are mainly focused on long-term postnatal outcomes including gastrointestinal function and neurodevelopment. Although infants born with gastroschisis often endure a difficult neonatal course, they experience few long-term complications. This manuscript, which is structured around common parental questions and concerns, reviews the evidence pertaining to the antenatal, neonatal and long-term implications of a fetal gastroschisis diagnosis and is aimed at helping healthcare professionals counsel expecting parents. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
11/05/2014 14:36
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:43
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