Effect of recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (Regranex) on wound closure in genetically diabetic mice.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_13CAB2B3ABB8
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Effect of recombinant platelet-derived growth factor (Regranex) on wound closure in genetically diabetic mice.
Périodique
Journal of burn care & research
Auteur(s)
Chan R.K., Liu P.H., Pietramaggiori G., Ibrahim S.I., Hechtman H.B., Orgill D.P.
ISSN
1559-047X (Print)
ISSN-L
1559-047X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2006
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
27
Numéro
2
Pages
202-205
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Burns, especially those involving large surface areas, represent a complex wound healing problem. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is released by activated platelets to recruit inflammatory cells toward the wound bed. It has effects on promoting angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation. However, the effectiveness of topical PDGF on wound closure is variable, ranging from little improvement observed in pig models to dramatic improvement reported in a diabetic mouse model. Here, we sought to determine the effectiveness of commercially sold PDGF-BB (Regranex) on wound closure in genetically diabetic mice. C57BL/KsJ db+/db+ mice and its host strain bearing dorsal 1.5-cm wounds were divided into groups (n = 8 in each group) receiving topical application of either Regranex (10 microg/wound) or vehicle for 5 consecutive days after wounding. The rate of wound closure was analyzed using computerized planimetry. The amount of granulation tissue was determined histologically. Our data indicate that diabetic mice exhibit a significant delay in wound closure when compared with their host strain. Topical application of Regranex did not improve the time to wound closure but did significantly increase the amount of granulation tissue. Our current study using commercially available Regranex failed to reproduce the previously reported finding that PDGF improved wound closure in healing impaired genetically diabetic mice.

Mots-clé
Administration, Topical, Angiogenesis Inducing Agents/administration & dosage, Animals, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/physiopathology, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor/administration & dosage, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-sis, Time Factors, Wound Healing/drug effects, Wound Healing/physiology, Wounds, Nonpenetrating/complications, Wounds, Nonpenetrating/drug therapy, Wounds, Nonpenetrating/physiopathology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
16/01/2018 15:41
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:42
Données d'usage