Imaging of experience-dependent structural plasticity in the mouse neocortex in vivo

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_13C30F973C96
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Imaging of experience-dependent structural plasticity in the mouse neocortex in vivo
Périodique
Behavioural Brain Research
Auteur(s)
Holtmaat A., De Paola V., Wilbrecht L., Knott G. W.
ISSN
0166-4328
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
09/2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
192
Numéro
1
Pages
20-25
Langue
anglais
Résumé
The functionality of adult neocortical circuits can be altered by novel experiences or learning. This functional plasticity appears to rely on changes in the strength of neuronal connections that were established during development. Here we will describe some of our studies in which we have addressed whether structural changes, including the remodeling of axons and dendrites with synapse formation and elimination, could underlie experience-dependent plasticity in the adult neocortex. Using 2-photon laser-scanning microscopes and transgenic mice expressing GFP in a subset of pyramidal cells, we have observed that a small subset of dendritic spines continuously appear and disappear on a daily basis, whereas the majority of spines persists for months. Axonal boutons from different neuronal classes displayed similar behavior, although the extent of remodeling varied. Under baseline conditions, new spines in the barrel cortex were mostly transient and rarely survived for more than a week. However, when every other whisker was trimmed, the generation and loss of persistent spines was enhanced. Ultrastructural reconstruction of previously imaged spines and boutons showed that new spines slowly form synapses. New spines persisting for a few days always had synapses, whereas very young spines often lacked synapses. New synapses were predominantly found on large, multi-synapse boutons, suggesting that spine growth is followed by synapse formation, preferentially on existing boutons. Altogether our data indicate that novel sensory experience drives the stabilization of new spines on subclasses of cortical neurons and promotes the formation of new synapses. These synaptic changes likely underlie experience-dependent functional remodeling of specific neocortical circuits.
Mots-clé
Animals Dendritic Spines/*physiology/ultrastructure Learning/*physiology Mice Neocortex/*physiology/ultrastructure Neural Pathways/physiology/ultrastructure Neuronal Plasticity/*physiology Presynaptic Terminals/physiology/ultrastructure Pyramidal Cells/*physiology/ultrastructure Synapses/*physiology/ultrastructure Synaptic Transmission/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
30/01/2009 11:13
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:42
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