Multifunctional, scrubby, and invasive forests? Wattles in the highlands of Madagascar

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_130854144ED4.P001.pdf (1214.59 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_130854144ED4
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Multifunctional, scrubby, and invasive forests? Wattles in the highlands of Madagascar
Périodique
Mountain Research and Development
Auteur(s)
Kull Christian A., Tassin Jacques, Rangan Haripriya
ISSN
1994-7151
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2007
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
27
Pages
224-31
Langue
anglais
Notes
http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.1659/mrd.0864
Résumé
Australian bipinnate acacias, known locally as mimosa, are widespread on the plateaus and mountains of Madagascar. Rarely, however, do these trees attain their full size, leading to a surprising landscape of 'scrubby' wattles. The authors review the introduction of the wattles, survey their multiple uses in rural livelihoods and environmental management, and analyse the forestry policies, tenure rules, and ecological factors that maintain the trees' scrubby state. This well-adapted plant is an important resource for farmers and serves to green treeless hills, but it may become a conundrum to conservation managers due to its non-native, invasive status.
Mots-clé
acacia-wattle-mimosa, invasive, introduced, alien, exotic, non native species, Madagascar
Création de la notice
11/03/2015 17:58
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:41
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