DAT1 polymorphism determines L-DOPA effects on learning about others' prosociality

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: BIB_1030C1843280.P001.pdf (342.47 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
ID Serval
serval:BIB_1030C1843280
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
DAT1 polymorphism determines L-DOPA effects on learning about others' prosociality
Périodique
PLoS ONE
Auteur(s)
Eisenegger C., Pedroni A., Rieskamp J., Zehnder C., Ebstein R., Fehr E., Knoch D.
ISSN
1932-6203
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
07/2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
8
Numéro
7
Pages
e67820
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Despite that a wealth of evidence links striatal dopamine to individualś reward learning performance in non-social environments, the neurochemical underpinnings of such learning during social interaction are unknown. Here, we show that the administration of 300 mg of the dopamine precursor L-DOPA to 200 healthy male subjects influences learning about a partners' prosocial preferences in a novel social interaction task, which is akin to a repeated trust game. We found learning to be modulated by a well-established genetic marker of striatal dopamine levels, the 40-bp variable number tandem repeats polymorphism of the dopamine transporter (DAT1 polymorphism). In particular, we found that L-DOPA improves learning in 10/10R genoype subjects, who are assumed to have lower endogenous striatal dopamine levels and impairs learning in 9/10R genotype subjects, who are assumed to have higher endogenous dopamine levels. These findings provide first evidence for a critical role of dopamine in learning whether an interaction partner has a prosocial or a selfish personality. The applied pharmacogenetic approach may open doors to new ways of studying psychiatric disorders such as psychosis, which is characterized by distorted perceptions of others' prosocial attitudes.
Mots-clé
Position-emission-tomography, Transporter gene, Social-interaction, Nucleus-accumbens, Working-memory, Human striatum, Reward, Humans, Brain, Trust
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
24/07/2013 9:28
Dernière modification de la notice
21/08/2019 7:08
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