Cellular and molecular basis for thyroid cancer imaging in nuclear medicine

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_0EEF78B9B18A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Cellular and molecular basis for thyroid cancer imaging in nuclear medicine
Périodique
Clinical and Translational Imaging
Auteur(s)
Bongiovanni M., Paone G., Ceriani L., Pusztaszeri M.
ISSN
2281-5872
ISSN-L
2281-5872
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
1
Numéro
3
Pages
149-161
Langue
anglais
Notes
PDF: Review
Résumé
Papillary and follicular thyroid carcinomas (well-differentiated forms) are the most common follicular cell-derived thyroid malignancies, while poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas (also poorly differentiated) are the less common ones. Papillary carcinomas are morphologically and genetically different from follicular carcinomas: the former are associated, in up to 70 % of cases, with BRAF or RAS point mutations or RET/PTC rearrangements; the latter carry the RAS point mutation or the PAX8/PPARgamma rearrangement. The poorly differentiated forms have abnormalities in the TP53 and the CTNNB1 genes. The best way to image thyroid cancer cells is to exploit the capability of normal follicular thyroid cells to concentrate iodine 131I through the sodium-iodine symporter. Iodine is necessary for the production of the thyroid hormones triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Unfortunately, the cells of poorly differentiated carcinomas lose the capability to concentrate iodine; at the same time, their basal metabolism increases to satisfy the energy demands of highly proliferating cells. These cells require more glucose and a glucose analog, namely 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (18FDG), is used in place of glucose to study their metabolism. The increased intake of glucose is mediated by a transmembrane transporter called glucose transporter-1 located on the cell membrane. The alternation of 131I and 18FDG uptake observed in thyroid tumors and their metastases is known as the "flip-flop" phenomenon. This review looks at the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying thyroid cancer and thyroid cancer imaging.
Mots-clé
Thyroid, GLUT-1, NIS, 18FDG PET/CT, Well- and poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
03/03/2015 16:00
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:35
Données d'usage