Particulate formulations for the delivery of poly(I:C) as vaccine adjuvant.

Détails

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Version: de l'auteur
ID Serval
serval:BIB_0E52C52ECA28
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Particulate formulations for the delivery of poly(I:C) as vaccine adjuvant.
Périodique
Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews
Auteur(s)
Hafner A.M., Corthésy B., Merkle H.P.
ISSN
1872-8294 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0169-409X
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Volume
65
Numéro
10
Pages
1386-1399
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Current research and development of antigens for vaccination often center on purified recombinant proteins, viral subunits, synthetic oligopeptides or oligosaccharides, most of them suffering from being poorly immunogenic and subject to degradation. Hence, they call for efficient delivery systems and potent immunostimulants, jointly denoted as adjuvants. Particulate delivery systems like emulsions, liposomes, nanoparticles and microspheres may provide protection from degradation and facilitate the co-formulation of both the antigen and the immunostimulant. Synthetic double-stranded (ds) RNA, such as polyriboinosinic acid-polyribocytidylic acid, poly(I:C), is a mimic of viral dsRNA and, as such, a promising immunostimulant candidate for vaccines directed against intracellular pathogens. Poly(I:C) signaling is primarily dependent on Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), and on melanoma differentiation-associated gene-5 (MDA-5), and strongly drives cell-mediated immunity and a potent type I interferon response. However, stability and toxicity issues so far prevented the clinical application of dsRNAs as they undergo rapid enzymatic degradation and bear the potential to trigger undue immune stimulation as well as autoimmune disorders. This review addresses these concerns and suggests strategies to improve the safety and efficacy of immunostimulatory dsRNA formulations. The focus is on technological means required to lower the necessary dosage of poly(I:C), to target surface-modified microspheres passively or actively to antigen-presenting cells (APCs), to control their interaction with non-professional phagocytes and to modulate the resulting cytokine secretion profile.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
18/11/2013 17:38
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:35
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