Micronutrient Deficiencies in Medical and Surgical Inpatients

Détails

Ressource 1Télécharger: 31261695_BIB_0E22591EAE52.pdf (346.24 [Ko])
Etat: Public
Version: Final published version
Licence: CC BY 4.0
ID Serval
serval:BIB_0E22591EAE52
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Micronutrient Deficiencies in Medical and Surgical Inpatients
Périodique
Journal of clinical medicine
Auteur(s)
Berger M.M., Pantet O., Schneider A., Ben-Hamouda N.
ISSN
2077-0383 (Print))
ISSN-L
2077-0383
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
28/06/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
8
Numéro
7
Pages
931
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: epublish
Résumé
Inpatients are threatened by global malnutrition, but also by specific micronutrient (i.e., trace element and vitamins) deficiencies that frequently are overseen in the differential diagnosis of major organ dysfunctions. Some of them are related to specific geographic risks (iodine, iron, selenium, zinc, vitamin A), while others are pathology related, and finally many are associated with specific feeding patterns, including low dose enteral feeding. Among the pathologies in which laboratory blood investigations should include a micronutrient outwork, anemia is in the front line, followed by obesity with bariatric surgery, chronic liver disease, kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, cardiomyopathies and heart failure. The micronutrients at the highest risk are iron, zinc, thiamine, vitamin B12 and vitamin C. Admission to hospital has been linked with an additional risk of malnutrition-feeding below 1500 kcal/day was frequent and has been associated with a structural additional risk of insufficient micronutrient intake to cover basal needs. Although not evidence based, systematic administration of liberal thiamine doses upon admission, and daily complementation of inpatients' food and enteral feeding solutions with multi-micronutrient tablets might be considered.
Mots-clé
copper, enteral nutrition, inflammation, iron, obesity, selenium, thiamine, vitamin B12, zinc
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
29/06/2019 14:35
Dernière modification de la notice
15/01/2021 8:08
Données d'usage