Entrance pupil size predicts retinal illumination in darkly pigmented eyes, but not lightly pigmented eyes.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_09CFCF5154FA
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Entrance pupil size predicts retinal illumination in darkly pigmented eyes, but not lightly pigmented eyes.
Périodique
Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Auteur(s)
Kardon R.H., Hong S., Kawasaki A.
ISSN
1552-5783 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0146-0404
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
54
Numéro
8
Pages
5559-5567
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Résumé
PURPOSE: We determined the effect of entrance pupil size on retinal illumination. The influence of unilateral miosis on the magnitude of the pupil light reflex was studied to ascertain how a clinically significant anisocoria influences the relative afferent pupil defect (RAPD).
METHODS: Miosis was induced by topical 1% pilocarpine in the right eye of 14 healthy subjects with normal eyes. The interocular difference in retinal illumination was assessed by computerized pupillometry from the stimulus response curve of the right and left eyes. The main outcome measure was the RAPD, determined by computerized pupillography, at baseline and after pilocarpine-induced anisocoria.
RESULTS: Induced anisocoria produced a significant change in RAPD from baseline (mean = 1.60 dB in the miotic eye, P = 0.007). However, anisocoria correlated with RAPD only in subjects with darkly pigmented irides (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.793, P = 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: In darkly pigmented eyes, entrance pupil size significantly influenced the retinal illumination. However, retinal illumination of lightly pigmented eyes is relatively independent of entrance pupil size, presumably due to extrapupillary transmission of light through the iris and sclera. This has important implications in understanding the potential influence of anisocoria on the RAPD and also greater susceptibility of lightly pigmented eyes to light toxicity.
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
05/08/2013 8:22
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:31
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