Differential characterization of women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_09679FA75717
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Differential characterization of women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome
Périodique
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Auteur(s)
Witkin  S. S., Gerber  S., Ledger  W. J.
ISSN
0002-9378 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
09/2002
Volume
187
Numéro
3
Pages
589-94
Notes
Journal Article --- Old month value: Sep
Résumé
OBJECTIVE: We differentiated women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome into subgroups on the basis of the time of symptom onset, a history of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis, and the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphism. STUDY DESIGN: One hundred sixty-two consecutive patients with strictly defined vulvar vestibulitis syndrome were asked to fill out a questionnaire with the assistance of their gynecologist. A buccal sample was collected from each subject for the analysis of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene polymorphism; vaginal and vestibular microbial investigations were performed. RESULTS: Symptoms began with the first act of coitus in 20.4% of patients. A history of a recurrent Candida vulvovaginal infection was reported in 42.6% of patients; 25.9% of the patients were positive for the homozygous interleukin-1 receptor antagonist 2,2 genotype. Women with primary vulvar vestibulitis syndrome differed from women with secondary vulvar vestibulitis syndrome; women with primary vulvar vestibulitis syndrome were younger at the time of the onset of the symptoms (23.8 vs 31.2 years, P <.0001) and had never been pregnant (84.8% vs 61.2%, P <.0001). Women with a history of recurrent Candida vulvovaginitis differed from the other subjects by having a higher frequency of constant vestibular pain (40.6% vs 20.4%, P =.005), a vaginal discharge (79.7% vs 45.2%, P <.0001), and dysuria (62.3% vs 29.0%, P =.0001). Women who were homozygous for interleukin-1 receptor antagonist 2,2 genotype had an earlier onset of symptoms (26 years) than did women who were allele 1 homozygotes (31.3 years, P <.05). They also had a shorter duration of symptoms (4.1 vs 5.9 years, P <.05) and a higher frequency of allergy (47.6% vs 23.4%, P =.002). Human papillomavirus in the vaginal vestibule occurred at a greater frequency in women who were homozygous for interleukin-1 receptor antagonist 2,2 genotype. CONCLUSION: Subgroups of women with vulvar vestibulitis syndrome may be differentiated by symptomatic and genetic variables.
Mots-clé
Adult Candidiasis, Vulvovaginal/complications Female Humans Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein Papillomaviridae/isolation & purification Polymorphism, Genetic Recurrence Sialoglycoproteins/*genetics Syndrome Vagina/microbiology Vulvitis/drug therapy/*etiology/genetics
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/01/2008 15:45
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:31
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