Level ground and uphill cycling efficiency in seated and standing positions

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_06077133CF8B
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Level ground and uphill cycling efficiency in seated and standing positions
Périodique
Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Auteur(s)
Millet G.P., Tronche C., Fuster N., Candau R.
ISSN
0195-9131
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
10/2002
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
34
Numéro
10
Pages
1645-1652
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
PURPOSE: This study was designed to examine the effects of cycling position (seated or standing) during level-ground and uphill cycling on gross external efficiency (GE) and economy (EC). METHODS: Eight well-trained cyclists performed in a randomized order five trials of 6-min duration at 75% of peak power output either on a velodrome or during the ascent of a hill in seated or standing position. GE and EC were calculated by using the mechanical power output that was measured by crankset (SRM) and energy consumption by a portable gas analyzer (Cosmed K4b(2)). In addition, each subject performed three 30-s maximal sprints on a laboratory-based cycle ergometer or in the field either in seated or standing position. RESULTS: GE and EC were, respectively, 22.4 +/- 1.5% (CV = 5.6%) and 4.69 +/- 0.33 kJ x L(-1) (CV = 5.7%) and were not different between level seated, uphill seated, or uphill standing conditions. Heart rate was significantly ( < 0.05) higher in standing position. In the uphill cycling trials, minute ventilation was higher ( < 0.05) in standing than in seated position. The average 30-s power output was higher ( < 0.01) in standing (803 +/- 103 W) than in seated position (635 +/- 123 W) or on the stationary ergometer (603 +/- 81 W). CONCLUSION: Gradient or body position appears to have a negligible effect on external efficiency in field-based high-intensity cycling exercise. Greater short-term power can be produced in standing position, presumably due to a greater force developed per revolution. However, the technical features of the standing position may be one of the most determining factors affecting the metabolic responses.
Mots-clé
Adolescent, Adult, Bicycling/physiology, Ergometry, Exercise Test, Humans, Male, Oxygen Consumption/physiology, Physical Exertion/physiology, Posture/physiology, Pulmonary Gas Exchange
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
25/09/2008 8:01
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:28
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