Evolution of the mating system in colonizing plants.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_05CB298C3891
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Sous-type
Synthèse (review): revue aussi complète que possible des connaissances sur un sujet, rédigée à partir de l'analyse exhaustive des travaux publiés.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Evolution of the mating system in colonizing plants.
Périodique
Molecular Ecology
Auteur(s)
Pannell J.R.
ISSN
1365-294X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0962-1083
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
24
Numéro
9
Pages
2018-2037
Langue
anglais
Résumé
Colonization is likely to be more successful for species with an ability to self-fertilize and thus to establish new populations as single individuals. As a result, self-compatibility should be common among colonizing species. This idea, labelled 'Baker's law', has been influential in discussions of sexual-system and mating-system evolution. However, its generality has been questioned, because models of the evolution of dispersal and the mating system predict an association between high dispersal rates and outcrossing rather than selfing, and because of many apparent counter examples to the law. The contrasting predictions made by models invoking Baker's law versus those for the evolution of the mating system and dispersal urges a reassessment of how we should view both these traits. Here, I review the literature on the evolution of mating and dispersal in colonizing species, with a focus on conceptual issues. I argue for the importance of distinguishing between the selfing or outcrossing rate and a simple ability to self-fertilize, as well as for the need for a more nuanced consideration of dispersal. Colonizing species will be characterized by different phases in their life pattern: dispersal to new habitat, implying an ecological sieve on dispersal traits; establishment and a phase of growth following colonization, implying a sieve on reproductive traits; and a phase of demographic stasis at high density, during which new trait associations can evolve through local adaptation. This dynamic means that the sorting of mating-system and dispersal traits should change over time, making simple predictions difficult.
Mots-clé
Baker's law, dioecy, metapopulation, outcrossing, pollen limitation, range expansion, reproductive assurance, self-fertilization, sex allocation
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
16/02/2015 14:38
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:27
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