Self-reported Neurocognitive Impairment in People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): Characterizing Clusters of Patients With Similar Changes in Self-reported Neurocognitive Impairment, 2013-2017, in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_04E1F806B33A
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Self-reported Neurocognitive Impairment in People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): Characterizing Clusters of Patients With Similar Changes in Self-reported Neurocognitive Impairment, 2013-2017, in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.
Périodique
Clinical infectious diseases
Auteur(s)
Kusejko K., Salazar-Vizcaya L., Braun D.L., Tarr P.E., Bernasconi E., Doco-Lecompte T., Cavassini M., Schmid P., Du Pasquier R., Hauser C., Günthard H.F., Kouyos R.D.
ISSN
1537-6591 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1058-4838
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
27/07/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
71
Numéro
3
Pages
637-644
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Self-reported neurocognitive impairment (SRNI) in people living with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is frequent. We use longitudinal information on SRNI in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) to identify and characterize groups of patients with persisting SRNI over time.
We included all SHCS patients who were assessed for SRNI during at least 5 visits spanning at least 2.5 years in 2013-2017. We first compared patients with SRNI to those without SRNI over the whole study period. Second, we used a hierarchical cluster algorithm to identify groups of patients with similar changes of SRNI over time. In both analyses, we studied clinical and demographic factors potentially influencing SRNI.
In total, 79 683 questionnaires of 11 029 patients contained information about SRNI, and 8545 of 11 029 (77.5%) patients had longitudinal information. The overall percentage of patients with SRNI decreased from 19.6% in 2013 to 10.7% in 2017. Compared to patients in the cluster with low-level SRNI over time, patients in the cluster with high-level persisting SRNI more often had a prior opportunistic infection of the central nervous system (CNS) (odds ratio [OR], 3.7; P < .001), imperfect adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) (OR, 2.8; P < .001), and depression (OR, 1.9; P < .001).
Although overall SRNI is decreasing in the SHCS, there is a group of patients with persisting SRNI over time. Past opportunistic infections of the CNS, imperfect adherence to ART, and depression were associated most with persisting SRNI. Patients with these characteristics should be preferentially tested for neurocognitive impairment.Although overall self-reported neurocognitive impairment (SRNI) is decreasing in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study, there is a group of patients with persisting SRNI over time, characterized by more past opportunistic infections of the central nervous system, imperfect adherence to antiretroviral therapy, and depression.
Mots-clé
HIV, self-reported neurocognitive impairment
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
13/09/2019 11:53
Dernière modification de la notice
04/11/2020 7:23
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