Men and women differ in their cardiovascular responses to affective pictures

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_0447F19F2BC2
Type
Actes de conférence (partie): contribution originale à la littérature scientifique, publiée à l'occasion de conférences scientifiques, dans un ouvrage de compte-rendu (proceedings), ou dans l'édition spéciale d'un journal reconnu (conference proceedings).
Sous-type
Abstract (résumé de présentation): article court qui reprend les éléments essentiels présentés à l'occasion d'une conférence scientifique dans un poster ou lors d'une intervention orale.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Men and women differ in their cardiovascular responses to affective pictures
Titre de la conférence
Joint Annual Meeting of the Swiss Respiratory Society, Swiss Society of Occupational Medicine, Swiss Paediatric Respiratory Society, Swiss Society for Thoracic Surgery, Davos (Switzerland), April 16/17, 2009
Auteur(s)
Gomez Patrick, Danuser Brigitta
ISBN
1424-7860
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
139
Série
Swiss Medical Weekly
Pages
10S
Langue
anglais
Notes
SAPHIRID:78939
Résumé
Empirical evidence supports the hypothesis that emotional states might contribute to cardiovascular disease and health through multiple pathways. To the extent that the acute cardiovascular response to emotional events plays a role in cardiovascular health and disease, an essential step in order to understand this possible link is to define the hemodynamic response to affective challenges. This was the aim of the present study. We assessed blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output, and total peripheral resistance (TPR) in response to 13 picture series in 18 men and 19 women (mean age 26) in order to investigate their hemodynamic responses associated with activation of the appetitive and defensive motivational systems underlying emotional experience. The hemodynamic parameters were recorded by finger-cuff photoplethysmography with Finometer™ (FMS Finapres Medical Systems, Amsterdam) and electrocardiography with the Lifeshirt system (VivoMetrics Inc., Ventura, California). Participants rated self-perceived pleasantness and arousal for each series. In men, BP and SV, but not TPR, increased with increasing self-rated arousal both for appetitive and defensive activation, whereas in women these relationships were almost absent, especially, for defensive activation. HR decelerated more in response to negative than positive and neutral pictures, and more so in men than women. These findings indicate striking sex differences. In particular, it is suggested that the sympathetic inotropic effect to the heart increases with increasing self-rated arousal strongly in men but only weakly in women. Regardless of sex differences, the modulation of the cardiovascular response to affective pictures along the dimensions of pleasantness and arousal is primarily myocardial, and the pattern of cardiovascular response is consistent with a configuration of cardiac sympathetic-parasympathetic coactivation. One possible implication of the observed sex differences concerns the link between affective states and cardiovascular health and disease. Men have a higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases than premenopausal women, and exaggerated sympathetic reactivity to emotional events is a potential pathophysiological mechanism. These findings extend current knowledge showing that under several acute behavioral challenges men demonstrate stronger cardiovascular reactivity than women.
Mots-clé
Respiration , Affect , Attention , Blinking , Carbon Dioxide , Photic Stimulation , Plethysmography , Pulmonary Ventilation , Tidal Volume , Time Factors
Création de la notice
27/01/2010 13:20
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 13:26
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