Selectively reduced posterior corpus callosum size in a population-based sample of young adults born with low birth weight.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_02E669B0B554
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Selectively reduced posterior corpus callosum size in a population-based sample of young adults born with low birth weight.
Périodique
AJNR. American journal of neuroradiology
Auteur(s)
Aukland S.M., Westerhausen R., Plessen K.J., Odberg M.D., Elgen I.B., Peterson B.S., Ersland L., Eide G.E., Rosendahl K.
ISSN
1936-959X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0195-6108
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
05/2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
32
Numéro
5
Pages
970-975
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Controlled Clinical Trial ; Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
Several studies suggest that VLBW is associated with a reduced CC size later in life. We aimed to clarify this in a prospective, controlled study of 19-year-olds, hypothesizing that those with LBWs had smaller subregions of CC than the age-matched controls, even after correcting for brain volume.
One hundred thirteen survivors of LBW (BW <2000 grams) without major handicaps and 100 controls underwent a 3T MR examination of the brain. The cross-sectional area of the CC (total callosal area, and the callosal subregions of the genu, truncus, and posterior third) was measured. Callosal areas were adjusted for head size.
The posterior third subregion of the CC was significantly smaller in individuals born with a LBW compared with controls, even after adjusting for size of the forebrain. Individuals who were born with a LBW had a smaller CC (mean area, 553.4 mm(2)) than the controls (mean area, 584.1 mm(2)). Differences in total area, however, did not remain statistically significant after adjusting for FBV.
The uncorrected callosal size in 19-years-olds born with LBW was smaller than that of normal controls. However, after adjusting for FBV, the group difference was restricted to the posterior third. The clinical impact of a smaller posterior part needs further investigation.
Mots-clé
Cephalometry, Corpus Callosum/pathology, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Very Low Birth Weight, Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods, Male, Reproducibility of Results, Sensitivity and Specificity, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Oui
Création de la notice
21/02/2019 9:29
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:25
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