Salt- and angiotensin II-dependent variations in amiloride-sensitive rectal potential difference in mice

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_01D76E838565
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Titre
Salt- and angiotensin II-dependent variations in amiloride-sensitive rectal potential difference in mice
Périodique
Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology
Auteur⸱e⸱s
Wang  Q., Horisberger  J. D., Maillard  M., Brunner  H. R., Rossier  B. C., Burnier  M.
ISSN
0305-1870 (Print)
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
02/2000
Volume
27
Numéro
1-2
Pages
60-6
Notes
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Jan-Feb
Résumé
1. In the rectum and distal nephron, sodium reabsorption is mediated by the amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). The ENaC-mediated sodium transport is electrogenic and creates an amiloride-sensitive transepithelial potential difference (PD). 2. We have evaluated the salt- and angiotensin (Ang)II-dependent variations in amiloride-sensitive rectal PD in mice and assessed their relationship with renal sodium handling. 3. Rectal PD was measured in vivo in mice maintained on a medium-, low- or high-sodium diet. On a medium-salt diet, the mean (+/- SEM) amiloride-sensitive PD was larger in the afternoon than in the morning (-26.1 +/- 0.9 and -11.2 +/- 0.7 mV, respectively; P = 0.001), indicating a circadian cyclicity. Rectal PD increased on a low-sodium diet and decreased on a high-sodium diet. 4. Amiloride-sensitive rectal PD correlated significantly with the urinary Na+/K+ ratio (P < 0.001) and with sodium reabsorption in the distal nephron as measured by the lithium clearance technique (P < 0.001). 5. In mice treated with an AngII AT1 receptor antagonist, amiloride-sensitive rectal PD was increased in the afternoon compared with controls (-32.8 +/- 2.0 vs -24.4 +/- 0.9, respectively; P < 0.001). 6. At high doses, AngII decreased the amiloride-sensitive rectal PD and this effect was blunted by an AT1 receptor antagonist. 7. These results show the presence of a salt-dependent daily cyclicity of sodium transport in the mouse rectum that follows circadian changes in sodium handling in the distal nephron. Angiotensin II appears to modulate this diurnal pattern of rectal amiloride-sensitive sodium transport.
Mots-clé
Angiotensin II/*pharmacology Animals Circadian Rhythm/drug effects/physiology Epithelial Sodium Channel Male Mice Mice, Inbred C57BL Potassium/urine Rectum/*drug effects/physiology Sodium/urine Sodium Channels/*drug effects/physiology Sodium, Dietary/*administration & dosage
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
24/01/2008 12:38
Dernière modification de la notice
20/08/2019 12:24
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