Nicotine Intake in Pregnant Smokers and a General Population of Smokers.

Détails

ID Serval
serval:BIB_00AA66763698
Type
Article: article d'un périodique ou d'un magazine.
Collection
Publications
Titre
Nicotine Intake in Pregnant Smokers and a General Population of Smokers.
Périodique
Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs
Auteur(s)
Berlin I., Jacob N., Heishman S.J.
ISSN
1938-4114 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1937-1888
Statut éditorial
Publié
Date de publication
01/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
79
Numéro
1
Pages
126-131
Langue
anglais
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Résumé
The purpose of this study was to assess whether pregnant smokers have the same nicotine intake from cigarettes as a general population of smokers and whether the known lower daily cigarette consumption among pregnant smokers is associated with higher nicotine intake among pregnant smokers.
The study was a cross-sectional comparison of pregnant smokers and a general population of smokers in smoking cessation clinics. Participants were treatment-seeking pregnant (n = 476), nonpregnant female (n = 116), and male (n = 195) smokers who participated in two independent smoking cessation trials. Nicotine intake was measured as saliva cotinine/ cigarette/kg body weight ratio.
The mean saliva cotinine (μg/L)/ cigarette/kg body weight (0.21, SD = 0.15) of pregnant smokers was similar to that of nonpregnant female smokers (0.24, SD = 0.14) and higher than that of male smokers (0.18, SD = 0.12, p = .002) despite a substantially lower number of cigarettes per day (pregnant smokers: 12, SD = 6; nonpregnant female smokers: 26.6, SD = 11.7; male smokers: 23.5, SD = 9.5, p < .001). Among pregnant smokers, saliva cotinine, as expected, increased in parallel with the number of cigarettes per day, but nicotine intake (cotinine/cigarette/kg body weight) was inversely associated with daily cigarette consumption (p < .001). No association between cigarettes per day and nicotine intake was observed in male and nonpregnant female smokers (p = .43).
This secondary analysis showed that pregnant smokers' nicotine intake was similar to that of a general population of smokers despite a lower cigarette consumption rate. Among pregnant smokers, lower daily cigarette consumption was associated with higher nicotine intake from cigarettes, suggesting compensatory smoking.
Mots-clé
Adult, Cotinine/analysis, Cross-Sectional Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Nicotine/administration & dosage, Pregnancy, Saliva, Smokers/statistics & numerical data, Smoking/epidemiology, Smoking Cessation, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Création de la notice
26/12/2019 17:05
Dernière modification de la notice
14/01/2020 7:26
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