The Effects of Time-Restricted Eating versus Standard Dietary Advice on Weight, Metabolic Health and the Consumption of Processed Food: A Pragmatic Randomised Controlled Trial in Community-Based Adults.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_FDFAF3F8C09F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The Effects of Time-Restricted Eating versus Standard Dietary Advice on Weight, Metabolic Health and the Consumption of Processed Food: A Pragmatic Randomised Controlled Trial in Community-Based Adults.
Journal
Nutrients
Author(s)
Phillips N.E., Mareschal J., Schwab N., Manoogian ENC, Borloz S., Ostinelli G., Gauthier-Jaques A., Umwali S., Rodriguez E.G., Aeberli D., Hans D., Panda S., Rodondi N., Naef F., Collet T.H.
ISSN
2072-6643 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2072-6643
Publication state
Published
Issued date
23/03/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
13
Number
3
Pages
1042
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Weight loss is key to controlling the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components, i.e., central obesity, hypertension, prediabetes and dyslipidaemia. The goals of our study were two-fold. First, we characterised the relationships between eating duration, unprocessed and processed food consumption and metabolic health. During 4 weeks of observation, 213 adults used a smartphone application to record food and drink consumption, which was annotated for food processing levels following the NOVA classification. Low consumption of unprocessed food and low physical activity showed significant associations with multiple MS components. Second, in a pragmatic randomised controlled trial, we compared the metabolic benefits of 12 h time-restricted eating (TRE) to standard dietary advice (SDA) in 54 adults with an eating duration > 14 h and at least one MS component. After 6 months, those randomised to TRE lost 1.6% of initial body weight (SD 2.9, p = 0.01), compared to the absence of weight loss with SDA (-1.1%, SD 3.5, p = 0.19). There was no significant difference in weight loss between TRE and SDA (between-group difference -0.88%, 95% confidence interval -3.1 to 1.3, p = 0.43). Our results show the potential of smartphone records to predict metabolic health and highlight that further research is needed to improve individual responses to TRE such as a shorter eating window or its actual clock time.
Keywords
NOVA classification, dietary advice, eating pattern, metabolic syndrome, processed food, time-restricted eating, weight loss
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
13/04/2021 15:36
Last modification date
24/04/2021 6:33
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