Physician response to "by-the-way" syndrome in primary care.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_FD020F7F70D6
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Physician response to "by-the-way" syndrome in primary care.
Journal
Journal of general internal medicine
Author(s)
Rodondi P.Y., Maillefer J., Suardi F., Rodondi N., Cornuz J., Vannotti M.
ISSN
0884-8734
1525-1497[electronic]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
24
Number
6
Pages
739-41
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't - Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: "By-the-way" syndrome, a new problem raised by the patient at an encounter's closure, is common, but little is known about how physicians respond when it occurs. We analyzed the content of the syndrome, predictors of its appearance, and the physician response. DESIGN/PARTICIPANTS: Cross-sectional study of 92 videotaped encounters in an academic primary care clinic. RESULTS: The syndrome occurred in 39.1% of observed encounters. Its major content was bio-psychosocial (39%), psychosocial (36%), or biomedical (25%), whereas physician responses were mostly biomedical (44%). The physician response was concordant with the patient's question in 61% of encounters if the content of the question was psychosocial, 21% if bio-psychosocial, and 78% if biomedical; 32% of physicians solicited the patient's agenda two times or more in the group without, versus 11% in the group with, the syndrome (P = 0.02). In 22% of the encounters, physicians did not give any answer to the patient's question, particularly (38.5%) if it was of psychosocial content. CONCLUSIONS: "By-the-way" syndrome is mainly bio-psychosocial or psychosocial in content, whereas the physician response is usually biomedical. Asking about the patient's agenda twice or more during the office visit might decrease the appearance of this syndrome.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
15/05/2009 14:34
Last modification date
01/10/2019 6:20
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