Effect of acute iron infusion on insulin secretion: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_FC386F5975F6
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Effect of acute iron infusion on insulin secretion: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial
Journal
eClinicalMedicine
Author(s)
Jaccard Evrim, Seyssel Kévin, Gouveia Alexandre, Vergely Catherine, Baratali Laila, Gubelmann Cédric, Froissart Marc, Favrat Bernard, Marques-Vidal Pedro, Tappy Luc, Waeber Gérard
ISSN
2589-5370
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/2022
Volume
48
Pages
101434
Language
english
Notes
L2018007900
2022-05-16
Abstract
Background: Chronic exposure to high iron levels increases diabetes risk partly by inducing oxidative stress, but the consequences of acute iron administration on beta cells are unknown. We tested whether the acute administration of iron for the correction of iron deficiency influenced insulin secretion and the production of reactive oxygen species. Methods: Single-center, double-blinded, randomized controlled trial conducted between June 2017 and March 2020. 32 women aged 18 to 47 years, displaying symptomatic iron deficiency without anaemia, were recruited from a community setting and randomly allocated (1:1) to a single infusion of 1000 mg intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (iron) or saline (placebo). The primary outcome was the between group mean difference from baseline to day 28 in first and second phase insulin secretion, assessed by a two-step hyperglycaemic clamp. All analyses were performed by intention to treat. This trial was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03191201. Findings: Iron infusion did not affect first and second phase insulin release. For first phase, the between group mean difference from baseline to day 28 was 0 μU × 10 min/mL [95% CI, -22 to 22, P = 0.99]. For second phase, it was -5 μUx10min/mL [95% CI, -161 to 151; P = 0.95] at the first plateau of the clamp and -249 μUx10min/mL [95% CI, -635 to 137; P = 0.20] at the second plateau. Iron infusion increased serum ascorbyl/ascorbate ratio, a marker of plasma oxidative stress, at day 14, with restoration of normal ratio at day 28 relative to placebo. Finally, high-sensitive C-reactive protein levels remained similar among groups. Interpretation: In iron deficient women without anaemia, intravenous administration of 1000 mg of iron in a single sitting did not impair glucose-induced insulin secretion despite a transient increase in the levels of circulating reactive oxygen species. Funding: The Swiss National Science Foundation, University of Lausanne and Leenaards, Raymond-Berger and Placide Nicod Foundations.
Keywords
General Medicine
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation
Fondation Leenaards
University of Lausanne
Create date
24/05/2022 10:15
Last modification date
04/06/2022 6:34
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