Seedling establishment of Asteraceae forbs along altitudinal gradients: a comparison of transplant experiments in the native and introduced ranges.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_FB3E1B17ADBF
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Seedling establishment of Asteraceae forbs along altitudinal gradients: a comparison of transplant experiments in the native and introduced ranges.
Journal
Diversity and Distributions
Author(s)
Poll M., Naylor B., Alexander J.M., Edwards  P.J., Dietz H.
ISSN
1366-9516
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
15
Number
2
Pages
254-265
Language
english
Abstract
Since ecological and evolutionary context changes when a plant species is introduced to a new area, it can be assumed that responses of alien plants to changing conditions along environmental gradients differ from those in their native range. Even if seed availability is not limited, the distribution of alien plants along such a gradient might still be restricted by their ability to germinate and establish as seedlings. In the present study, we aim at testing what factors promote or limit plant invasions during early establishment by using altitude as a model gradient.
Altitudinal gradients in the Wallowa Mountains (Oregon, USA) and the Swiss Alps (Valais, Switzerland).
In transplant experiments along altitudinal gradients, we investigated the early establishment success of eight invasive alien Asteraceae species in their native and introduced ranges in the Wallowa Mountains and the Swiss Alps.
Seedling recruitment was not restricted to relatively lower altitudes in the introduced range. In addition, we found no evidence for genetic adaptation along the altitudinal gradient in the introduced range, highlighting the importance of phenotypic flexibility for invasions. Furthermore, seedling recruitment was only enhanced by disturbance in the native range where vegetation was comparably dense but not in the introduced range. However, plant development was strongly delayed in the introduced range, probably due to low seasonal water availability.
We conclude that introduced plants, due to their ability to tolerate a wide range of environmental conditions, are not necessarily more restricted in their altitudinal limits than they are in their native range. Furthermore, due to other interacting factors (e.g. different competition situations among ranges), attempts to predict distributions of alien plants in the introduced range that are based on their distributions in the native range may be misleading.
Keywords
Altitude, biological invasions, disturbance, environmental gradients, plant invasions, roadsides, transplant experiment
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
01/09/2016 10:07
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:26
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