Wide-pulse-high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation in cerebral palsy.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_FAA9E7125AA2
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Wide-pulse-high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation in cerebral palsy.
Journal
Clinical neurophysiology
Author(s)
Neyroud D., Armand S., De Coulon G., Da Silva SRD, Wegrzyk J., Gondin J., Kayser B., Place N.
ISSN
1872-8952 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1388-2457
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/2016
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
127
Number
2
Pages
1530-1539
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The present study assesses whether wide-pulse-high-frequency (WPHF) neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) could result in extra-force production in cerebral palsy (CP) patients as previously observed in healthy individuals.
Ten CP and 10 age- and sex-matched control participants underwent plantar flexors NMES. Two to three 10-s WPHF (frequency: 100 Hz, pulse duration: 1 ms) and conventional (CONV, frequency 25 Hz, pulse duration: 50 μs) trains as well as two to three burst-like stimulation trains (2s at 25 Hz, 2s at 100 Hz, 2s at 25 Hz; pulse duration: 1 ms) were evoked. Resting soleus and gastrocnemii maximal H-reflex amplitude (Hmax) was normalized by maximal M-wave amplitude (Mmax) to quantify α-motoneuron modulation.
Similar Hmax/Mmax ratio was found in CP and control participants. Extra-force generation was observed both in CP (+18 ± 74%) and control individuals (+94 ± 124%) during WPHF (p<0.05). Similar extra-forces were found during burst-like stimulations in both groups (+108 ± 110% in CP and +65 ± 85% in controls, p>0.05).
Although the mechanisms underlying extra-force production may differ between WPHF and burst-like NMES, similar increases were observed in patients with CP and healthy controls.
Development of extra-forces in response to WPHF NMES evoked at low stimulation intensity might open new possibilities in neuromuscular rehabilitation.
Keywords
Adult, Cerebral Palsy/diagnosis, Cerebral Palsy/physiopathology, Electric Stimulation/methods, Electromyography/methods, Female, H-Reflex/physiology, Humans, Male, Muscle Contraction/physiology, Neuromuscular Junction/physiology, Young Adult, Cerebral palsy, Extra-force, Hmax/Mmax ratio, Neuromuscular electrical stimulation
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
28/09/2015 6:17
Last modification date
21/02/2020 7:19
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