Argemone mexicana decoction versus artesunate-amodiaquine for the management of malaria in Mali: policy and public-health implications.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_F6842AEBED8D
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Argemone mexicana decoction versus artesunate-amodiaquine for the management of malaria in Mali: policy and public-health implications.
Journal
Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Author(s)
Graz Bertrand, Willcox Merlin L., Diakite Chiaka, Falquet Jacques, Dackuo Florent, Sidibe Oumar, Giani Sergio, Diallo Drissa
ISSN
1878-3503[electronic]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
104
Number
1
Pages
33-41
Language
english
Abstract
A classic way of delaying drug resistance is to use an alternative when possible. We tested the malaria treatment Argemone mexicana decoction (AM), a validated self-prepared traditional medicine made with one widely available plant and safe across wide dose variations. In an attempt to reflect the real situation in the home-based management of malaria in a remote Malian village, 301 patients with presumed uncomplicated malaria (median age 5 years) were randomly assigned to receive AM or artesunate-amodiaquine [artemisinin combination therapy (ACT)] as first-line treatment. Both treatments were well tolerated. Over 28 days, second-line treatment was not required for 89% (95% CI 84.1-93.2) of patients on AM, versus 95% (95% CI 88.8-98.3) on ACT. Deterioration to severe malaria was 1.9% in both groups in children aged </=5 years (there were no cases in patients aged >5 years) and 0% had coma/convulsions. AM, now government-approved in Mali, could be tested as a first-line complement to standard modern drugs in high-transmission areas, in order to reduce the drug pressure for development of resistance to ACT, in the management of malaria. In view of the low rate of severe malaria and good tolerability, AM may also constitute a first-aid treatment when access to other antimalarials is delayed.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
07/01/2010 16:55
Last modification date
01/10/2019 7:20
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