Subtypes of stuttering determined by latent class analysis in two Swiss epidemiological surveys.

Details

Ressource 1Download: 30086147.pdf (1277.72 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_F4D1C25A19A2
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Subtypes of stuttering determined by latent class analysis in two Swiss epidemiological surveys.
Journal
PloS one
Author(s)
Ajdacic-Gross V., Bechtiger L., Rodgers S., Müller M., Kawohl W., von Känel R., Mutsch M., Rössler W., Seifritz E., Castelao E., Strippoli M.F., Vandeleur C., Preisig M., Howell P.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
13
Number
8
Pages
e0198450
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Associations between stuttering in childhood and a broad spectrum of risk factors, associated factors and comorbidities were examined in two large epidemiological studies. Subtypes of stuttering were then identified based on latent class analysis (LCA).
Data were from two representative Swiss population samples: PsyCoLaus (N = 4,874, age 35-82 years) and the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey (N = 1,500, age 20-41 years). Associations between stuttering and sociodemographic characteristics, familial aggregation, comorbidity and psychosocial risk / associated factors were investigated in both samples. LCAs were conducted on selected items from people in both samples who reported having stuttered in childhood.
Initial analyses linked early anxiety disorders, such as separation anxiety disorder and overanxious disorder, to stuttering (PsyCoLaus). ADHD was associated with stuttering in both datasets. In the analyses of risk / associated factors, dysfunctional parental relationships, inter-parental violence and further childhood adversities were mutual predictors of stuttering. Moreover, comorbidities were seen with hay fever, asthma, eczema and psoriasis (PsyCoLaus). Subsequent LCA identified an unspecific group of persons who self-reported that they stuttered and a group defined by associations with psychosocial adversities (ZINEP, PsyCoLaus) and atopic diseases (PsyCoLaus).
The two subtypes of developmental stuttering have different risk / associated factors and comorbidity patterns. Most of the factors are associated with vulnerability mechanisms that occur early in life and that have also been linked with other neurodevelopmental disorders. Both psychosocial and biological factors appear to be involved in the etiopathogenesis of stuttering.
Keywords
Adult, Age of Onset, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Comorbidity, Epidemiologic Research Design, Female, Humans, Latent Class Analysis, Male, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Stuttering/classification, Stuttering/epidemiology, Surveys and Questionnaires, Switzerland/epidemiology, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
23/08/2018 10:05
Last modification date
27/09/2019 8:51
Usage data