Rare Earth Elements in oyster shells: provenance discrimination and potential vital effects

Details

Ressource 1Download: bg-17-2205-2020.pdf (5219.84 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_F4A792703E2D
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Rare Earth Elements in oyster shells: provenance discrimination and potential vital effects
Journal
Biogeosciences
Author(s)
Mouchi Vincent, Godbillot Camille, Forest Vianney, Ulianov Alexey, Lartaud Franck, de Rafélis Marc, Emmanuel Laurent, Verrecchia Eric P.
Publication state
Submitted to the publisher
Language
english
Abstract
Rare Earth Elements and yttrium (REY) in seawater originate from atmospheric fallout, continental weathering, and transport from rivers, as well as hydrothermal activity. Previous studies reported the use of REY measurements in biogenic carbonates as a means to reconstruct these surface processes in ancient times. As coastal seawater REY concentrations partially reflect those of nearby rivers, it may be possible to obtain a regional fingerprint of these concentrations from bivalve shells for provenance and environmental monitoring studies. Here, we present a dataset of 260 measurements of REY abundances by LA-ICP-MS from 42 oyster specimens from six locations in France (Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea), and from two species (Crassostrea gigas and Ostrea edulis). Our study reports that there is no significant difference in concentrations from shell parts corresponding to winter and summer periods for both species. Moreover, interspecific vital effects are reported from specimens from both species and from the same locality. REY profiles and t-distributed Stochastic Neighbour Embedding processing (t-SNE; a discriminant statistical method) indicate that REY measurements from C. gigas shells can be discriminated from one locality to another, but this is not the case for O. edulis, which presents very similar concentrations in all studied localities. Therefore, provenance studies using bivalve shells based on REY have to be first tested for the species, and are not adapted for O. edulis. Other methods have to be investigated to be able to find the provenance of some species such as O. edulis.
Open Access
Yes
Create date
09/12/2019 10:31
Last modification date
24/12/2022 6:44
Usage data