Laparoscopic band repositioning for pouch dilatation/slippage after gastric banding: disappointing results.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_F394F2432ABE
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Laparoscopic band repositioning for pouch dilatation/slippage after gastric banding: disappointing results.
Journal
Obesity Surgery
Author(s)
Suter M.
ISSN
0960-8923 (Print)
ISSN-L
0960-8923
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2001
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
11
Number
4
Pages
507-512
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Pouch dilatation with or without slippage of the band is a serious complication of gastric banding, often attributed to initial malpositioning of the band. Food intake is increased, and weight regain occurs. Progressive rotation of the band follows, leading to functional stenosis and dysphagia. Reoperation is necessary in most cases, and may consist of band removal, band change, band repositioning, or conversion to another bariatric procedure.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study consisted of chart review of all patients who underwent laparoscopic repositioning of the band for pouch dilatation/slippage, and long-term follow-up through regular office visits and phone calls.
RESULTS: Among 272 patients who had laparoscopic gastric banding, 20 (7.3%) developed pouch dilatation and/or slippage, of whom 19 underwent reoperation. Laparoscopic band repositioning was performed in 9 patients. One of them developed an intraabdominal collection postoperatively and required percutaneous CT-guided drainage. Recovery was uneventful in the other 8. Follow-up since reoperation varies from 13 to 42 months (mean 20 months). The result was good in 2 patients who lost further weight, satisfactory in 1 whose weight remained stable, and unsatisfactory in 6 patients. Weight loss was insufficient in 2, dilatation recurred in 2, and band infection or erosion developed each in 1 patient. 5 patients required further surgery: band removal in 3 and conversion to gastric bypass in 2.
CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic band repositioning is feasible and safe if pouch dilatation and/or slippage develops after gastric banding. The mid-term results are disappointing in two-thirds of the patients. In some patients, pouch dilatation could result from poor adjustment to diet restriction rather than merely from original malplacement. Conversion to gastric bypass may be a better option in these cases.
Keywords
Adult, Body Mass Index, Constriction, Pathologic/diagnosis, Constriction, Pathologic/etiology, Deglutition Disorders/diagnosis, Deglutition Disorders/etiology, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gastroplasty/adverse effects, Gastroplasty/instrumentation, Gastroscopy/methods, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Selection, Recurrence, Reoperation/instrumentation, Reoperation/methods, Risk Factors, Stomach/pathology, Treatment Failure, Weight Gain
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
18/10/2014 16:33
Last modification date
20/08/2019 17:20
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