Association of socioeconomic status with sleep disturbances in the Swiss population-based CoLaus study.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_F36047CEE2B2
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Association of socioeconomic status with sleep disturbances in the Swiss population-based CoLaus study.
Journal
Sleep Medicine
Author(s)
Stringhini S., Haba-Rubio J., Marques-Vidal P., Waeber G., Preisig M., Guessous I., Bovet P., Vollenweider P., Tafti M., Heinzer R.
ISSN
1878-5506 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1389-9457
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Volume
16
Number
4
Pages
469-476
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of socioeconomic status (SES) with subjective and objective sleep disturbances and the role of socio-demographic, behavioural and psychological factors in explaining this association.
METHODS: Analyses are based on 3391 participants (53% female, aged 40-81 years) of the follow-up of the CoLaus study (2009-2012), a population-based sample of the city of Lausanne, Switzerland. All participants completed a sleep questionnaire and a sub-sample (N = 1569) underwent polysomnography.
RESULTS: Compared with men with a high SES, men with a low SES were more likely to suffer from poor sleep quality [prevalence ratio (PR) for occupational position = 1.68, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.30-2.17], and to have long sleep latency (PR = 4.90, 95%CI: 2.14-11.17), insomnia (PR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.12-1.93) and short sleep duration (PR = 3.03, 95% CI: 1.78-5.18). The same pattern was observed among women (PR = 1.29 for sleep quality, 2.34 for sleep latency, 2.01 for daytime sleepiness, 3.16 for sleep duration, 95%CIs ranging from 1.00 to 7.51). Use of sleep medications was not patterned by SES. SES differences in sleep disturbances were only marginally attenuated by adjustment for other socio-demographic, behavioural and psychological factors. Results from polysomnography confirmed poorer sleep patterns among participants with low SES (p <0.05 for sleep efficiency/stage shifts), but no SES differences were found for sleep duration.
CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based sample, low SES was strongly associated with sleep disturbances, independently of socio-demographic, behavioural, and psychological factors. Further research should establish the extent to which social differences in sleep contribute to socioeconomic differences in health outcomes.
Keywords
Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polysomnography, Risk Factors, Sex Factors, Sleep Deprivation/epidemiology, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology, Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology, Socioeconomic Factors, Switzerland/epidemiology
Pubmed
Create date
24/04/2016 10:43
Last modification date
19/11/2019 7:26
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