An Ion Transport-Independent Role for the Cation-Chloride Cotransporter KCC2 in Dendritic Spinogenesis In Vivo.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_F229C393E903
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
An Ion Transport-Independent Role for the Cation-Chloride Cotransporter KCC2 in Dendritic Spinogenesis In Vivo.
Journal
Cerebral Cortex
Author(s)
Fiumelli H., Briner A., Puskarjov M., Blaesse P., Belem B.J., Dayer A.G., Kaila K., Martin J.L., Vutskits L.
ISSN
1460-2199 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1047-3211
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
23
Number
2
Pages
378-388
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Abstract
The neuron-specific K-Cl cotransporter, KCC2, is highly expressed in the vicinity of excitatory synapses in pyramidal neurons, and recent in vitro data suggest that this protein plays a role in the development of dendritic spines. The in vivo relevance of these observations is, however, unknown. Using in utero electroporation combined with post hoc iontophoretic injection of Lucifer Yellow, we show that premature expression of KCC2 induces a highly significant and permanent increase in dendritic spine density of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the somatosensory cortex. Whole-cell recordings revealed that this increased spine density is correlated with an enhanced spontaneous excitatory activity in KCC2-transfected neurons. Precocious expression of the N-terminal deleted form of KCC2, which lacks the chloride transporter function, also increased spine density. In contrast, no effect on spine density was observed following in utero electroporation of a point mutant of KCC2 (KCC2-C568A) where both the cotransporter function and the interaction with the cytoskeleton are disrupted. Transfection of the C-terminal domain of KCC2, a region involved in the interaction with the dendritic cytoskeleton, also increased spine density. Collectively, these results demonstrate a role for KCC2 in excitatory synaptogenesis in vivo through a mechanism that is independent of its ion transport function.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
07/02/2013 18:54
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:11
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