Human cooperation in social dilemmas: comparing the Snowdrift game with the Prisoner's Dilemma.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_F0E6B3CA3FAF
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Human cooperation in social dilemmas: comparing the Snowdrift game with the Prisoner's Dilemma.
Journal
Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Author(s)
Kümmerli R., Colliard C., Fiechter N., Petitpierre B., Russier F., Keller L.
ISSN
0962-8452
Publication state
Published
Issued date
12/2007
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
274
Number
1628
Pages
2965-2970
Language
english
Abstract
Explaining the evolution of cooperation among non-relatives is one of the major challenges for evolutionary biology. In this study, we experimentally examined human cooperation in the iterated Snowdrift game (ISD), which has received little attention so far, and compared it with human cooperation in the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma (IPD), which has become the paradigm for the evolution of cooperation. We show that iteration in the ISD leads to consistently higher levels of cooperation than in the IPD. We further demonstrate that the most successful strategies known for the IPD (generous Tit-for-Tat and Pavlov) were also successfully used in the ISD. Interestingly, we found that female players cooperated significantly more often than male players in the IPD but not in the ISD. Moreover, female players in the IPD applied Tit-for-Tat-like or Pavlovian strategies significantly more often than male players, thereby achieving significantly higher pay-offs than male players did. These data demonstrate that the willingness to cooperate does not only depend on the type of the social dilemma, but also on the class of individuals involved. Altogether, our study shows that the ISD can potentially explain high levels of cooperation among non-relatives in humans. In addition, the ISD seems to reflect the social dilemma more realistically than the IPD because individuals obtain immediate direct benefits from the cooperative acts they perform and costs of cooperation are shared between cooperators.
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior, Evolution, Female, Game Theory, Humans, Male, Sex Factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/01/2008 19:39
Last modification date
03/03/2018 22:37
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