Sleep and waking have a major effect on the 24-hr rhythm of cortical temperature in the rat.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_F04CD0E9D865
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Sleep and waking have a major effect on the 24-hr rhythm of cortical temperature in the rat.
Journal
Journal of biological rhythms
Author(s)
Franken P., Tobler I., Borbély A.A.
ISSN
0748-7304
Publication state
Published
Issued date
1992
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
7
Number
4
Pages
341-352
Language
english
Abstract
The relationship between the time course of cortical temperature (TCRT) and sleep-wake alternation was investigated by correlation analyses and a computer simulation. The data for these analyses were collected in 10 rats in a 4-day experiment (LD 12:12), during which vigilance states and TCRT were determined for consecutive 8-sec epochs. On day 1 baseline recordings were obtained; on day 2 the animals were sleep-deprived; and days 3 and 4 served as recovery days. The correlation analyses revealed that the alternation of sleep and waking accounted for 84% of the variance of TCRT when analyzed for hourly intervals. The residual variance displayed a 24-hr periodicity with an amplitude of 0.15 degrees C. Similar results were obtained in a separate data set of a 2-day experiment, which consisted of a baseline day (LD 12:12) and a day with constant darkness. The periodicity of the residual variance of TCRT can therefore be considered to represent the circadian temperature rhythm not masked by the vigilance states. In the computer simulation, the time course of TCRT was simulated on the basis of the sequence of the vigilance states with an 8-sec time resolution. It was assumed that TCRT increases during waking and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep according to an exponential saturating function, and decreases exponentially during non-REM sleep. The simulations could account for 88-93% of the variance of TCRT. We conclude that in the rat, the major part of the variation of TCRT is accounted for by vigilance states, whereas a minor part can be attributed to a direct effect of the circadian pacemaker.
Keywords
Animals, Arousal/physiology, Body Temperature/physiology, Cerebral Cortex/physiology, Circadian Rhythm/physiology, Computer Simulation, Electroencephalography, Electromyography, Male, Rats, Regression Analysis, Sleep/physiology, Sleep, REM/physiology, Wakefulness/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/01/2008 16:31
Last modification date
03/03/2018 22:36
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