Predictors and interdependence of family support in a random sample of long-term young breast cancer survivors and their biological relatives.

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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_EBFF6234EED7
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Predictors and interdependence of family support in a random sample of long-term young breast cancer survivors and their biological relatives.
Journal
Cancer medicine
Author(s)
Katapodi M.C., Ellis K.R., Schmidt F., Nikolaidis C., Northouse L.L.
ISSN
2045-7634 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2045-7634
Publication state
Published
Issued date
10/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
7
Number
10
Pages
4980-4992
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't ; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Women diagnosed with breast cancer younger than 45 years (young breast cancer survivors-YBCS) and their biological relatives face significant stressors. Although family support is an important coping resource, little is known about YBCS' and relatives' support and whether it is interdependent. The study described family support in YBCS and their biological relatives; identified demographic, clinical, and psychosocial predictors of support; and determined the interdependence of support in YBCS-relatives family units.
Data were collected from a random sample of YBCS and their first- or second-degree female relatives. Actor-partner interdependence models (APIM) explored predictors and interdependence of YBCS' and relatives' family support in dyads (YBCS and relative) and triads (YBCS and two relatives).
Among n = 310 YBCS and n = 431 first- or second-degree relatives, family support was higher in triads compared to dyads. APIMs identified actor effects in dyads, and actor and partner effects in triads. Across all family units, YBCS' higher self-efficacy was associated with higher YBCS support (actor effect) and relative support (partner effect); YBCS' prior diagnosis of depression was associated with lower YBCS and relative support (actor and partner effect); cost-related lack of access to care was associated with lower support among YBCS (actor effect) and relatives (actor and partner effect).
Family support was interdependent and was affected by self-efficacy, depression, and access to care. Interventions should include YBCS and relatives, enhance self-efficacy and access to care.
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological, Adult, Breast Neoplasms/psychology, Cancer Survivors/psychology, Caregivers/psychology, Depression/etiology, Depression/psychology, Female, Humans, Middle Aged, Self Efficacy, Young Adult, Actor-Partner Interdependence Model, dyads, principal component analysis, random sample, triads, young breast cancer survivors
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
11/11/2018 16:55
Last modification date
16/11/2019 7:16
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