Eating disorders among female adolescents in Switzerland: prevalence and associations with mental and behavioral disorders

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_EAB02C1D747B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Eating disorders among female adolescents in Switzerland: prevalence and associations with mental and behavioral disorders
Journal
International Journal of Eating Disorders
Author(s)
Devaud  C., Jeannin  A., Narring  F., Ferron  C., Michaud  P. A.
ISSN
0276-3478 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
09/1998
Volume
24
Number
2
Pages
207-16
Notes
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Sep
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To measure the prevalence of eating disorders in a national representative sample of adolescent girls and association of eating disorders with other behavioral/mental problems in Switzerland. METHODS: As part of a national health survey, a subsample of 1,084 15 to 20-year-old female students attending school aged filled in a self-administered anonymous questionnaire focusing on eating behavior and body image. Factor analysis made on these specific questions reveals two major dimensions: weight and image concern (WIC) and problematic eating conduct (PEC). The correlates of these two dimensions were measured using bivariate analyses. RESULTS: Among girls, 62% say they want to lose weight, 36% feel too fat, 37% report fasting episodes, 18.9% fear not to be able to stop eating, 9.1% engage in binge eating at least once a week (1.9% daily), 1.6% self-induced vomit at least once a week (0.2% daily). Girls who exhibit high WIC (N = 198) or high PEC (N = 75) scores report significantly more mood problems (p < .05), suicidal conducts (p < .05), or violent and aggressive behaviors (p < .05). No association is found with substance use. Associations with acting-out behavior are stronger among high PEC subjects, whereas those with mood disorders are stronger among high WIC subjects. CONCLUSION: A large proportion of adolescent girls show concerns regarding their weight and body image whereas a less important proportion exhibit dysfunctional eating behavior. The results confirm the associations between eating disorder and mood, suicide, and conduct problems but infirm the association with substance use. Girls who exhibit problematic conducts appear to require more attention from health resources.
Keywords
Adolescent Adult Body Image Body Weight Child Behavior Disorders/diagnosis/*epidemiology/psychology Comorbidity Cross-Sectional Studies Eating Disorders/diagnosis/*epidemiology/psychology Female Humans Incidence Mental Disorders/diagnosis/*epidemiology/psychology Switzerland/epidemiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
25/01/2008 13:21
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:13
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