Notch1 is essential for postnatal hair follicle development and homeostasis

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_E9E2C21EA707
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Notch1 is essential for postnatal hair follicle development and homeostasis
Journal
Developmental Biology
Author(s)
Vauclair  S., Nicolas  M., Barrandon  Y., Radtke  F.
ISSN
0012-1606 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/2005
Volume
284
Number
1
Pages
184-93
Notes
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Aug 1
Abstract
Notch genes encode evolutionarily conserved large, single transmembrane receptors, which regulate many cell fate decisions and differentiation processes during fetal and postnatal life. Multiple Notch receptors and ligands are expressed in both developing and adult epidermis and hair follicles. Proliferation and differentiation of these two ectodermal-derived structures have been proposed to be controlled in part by the Notch pathway. Whether Notch signaling is involved in postnatal hair homeostasis is currently unknown. Here, we investigate and compare the role of the Notch1 receptor during embryonic hair follicle development and postnatal hair homeostasis using Cre-loxP based tissue specific and inducible loss-of-function approaches. During embryonic development, tissue-specific ablation of Notch1 does not perturb formation and patterning of hair follicle placodes. However, Notch1 deficient hair follicles invaginate prematurely into the dermis. Embryonic as well as postnatal inactivation of Notch1 shortly after birth or in adult mice results in almost complete hair loss followed by cyst formation. The first hair cycle of Notch1 deficient mice is characterized by shortened anagen and a premature entry into catagen. These data show that Notch1 is essential for late stages of hair follicle development during embryogenesis as well as for post-natal hair follicle development and hair homeostasis.
Keywords
Animals DNA Primers Gene Deletion Hair Follicle/embryology/*growth & development/metabolism/ultrastructure Immunohistochemistry In Situ Hybridization Integrases Mice Microscopy, Electron, Scanning Polymerase Chain Reaction Receptor, Notch1/*metabolism Signal Transduction/*physiology beta-Galactosidase
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
28/01/2008 11:39
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:12
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