Reduced cardiorespiratory fitness, low physical activity and an urban environment are independently associated with increased cardiovascular risk in children.

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It was possible to publish this article open access thanks to a Swiss National Licence with the publisher.
Serval ID
serval:BIB_E92F973B3F26
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Reduced cardiorespiratory fitness, low physical activity and an urban environment are independently associated with increased cardiovascular risk in children.
Journal
Diabetologia
Author(s)
Kriemler S., Manser-Wenger S., Zahner L., Braun-Fahrländer C., Schindler C., Puder J.J.
ISSN
0012-186X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2008
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
51
Number
8
Pages
1408-1415
Language
english
Abstract
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: To assist in the development of preventive strategies, we studied whether the neighbourhood environment or modifiable behavioural parameters, including cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and physical activity (PA), are independently associated with obesity and metabolic risk markers in children. METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional analysis of 502 randomly selected first and fifth grade urban and rural Swiss schoolchildren with regard to CRF, PA and the neighbourhood (rural vs urban) environment. Outcome measures included BMI, sum of four skinfold thicknesses, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and a standardised clustered metabolic risk score. RESULTS: CRF and PA (especially total PA, but also the time spent engaged in light and in moderate and vigorous intensity PA) were inversely associated with measures of obesity, HOMA-IR and the metabolic risk score, independently of each other, and of sociodemographic and nutritional parameters, media use, sleep duration, BMI and the neighbourhood environment (all p < 0.05). Children living in a rural environment were more physically active and had higher CRF values and reduced HOMA-IR and metabolic risk scores compared with children living in an urban environment (all p < 0.05). These differences in cardiovascular risk factors persisted after adjustment for CRF, total PA and BMI. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Reduced CRF, low PA and an urban environment are independently associated with an increase in metabolic risk markers in children.
Keywords
Blood Glucose, Blood Pressure, Body Mass Index, C-Reactive Protein, Cardiovascular Diseases, Child, Exercise, Female, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Life Style, Lipids, Male, Motor Activity, Obesity, Physical Fitness, Risk Factors, Skinfold Thickness, Urban Population
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
13/03/2009 12:40
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:11
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