Low adaptive potential for tolerance to ethynylestradiol, but also low toxicity, in a grayling population (Thymallus thymallus).

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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_E9103B57628F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Low adaptive potential for tolerance to ethynylestradiol, but also low toxicity, in a grayling population (Thymallus thymallus).
Journal
BMC evolutionary biology
Author(s)
Marques da Cunha L., Maitre D., Wedekind C.
ISSN
1471-2148 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1471-2148
Publication state
Published
Issued date
16/12/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
19
Number
1
Pages
227
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
The presence of a novel pollutant can induce rapid evolution if there is additive genetic variance for the tolerance to the stressor. Continuous selection over some generations can then reduce the toxicity of the pollutant but also deplete the additive genetic variance for the tolerance and thereby slow down adaptation. One common pollutant that has been ecologically relevant for some time is 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), a synthetic compound of oral contraceptives since their market launch in the 1960s. EE2 is typically found in higher concentrations in rivers than in lakes. Recent experimental work revealed significant genetic variance for the tolerance to EE2 in two lake-spawning salmonid species but no such variance in river-spawning brown trout. We used another river-spawning salmonid, the European grayling Thymallus thymallus, to study the toxicity of an ecologically relevant concentration of EE2. We also used a full-factorial in vitro breeding design and singly rearing of 1555 embryos and larvae of 40 sib groups to test whether there is additive genetic variance for the tolerance to this pollutant.
We found that exposure to EE2 reduced larval growth after hatching, but contrary to what has been found in the other salmonids, there were no significant effects of EE2 on embryo growth and survival. We found additive genetic variance for embryo viability, i.e. heritability for fitness. However, there was no significant additive variance for the tolerance to EE2.
Our findings support the hypothesis that continuous selection has reduced the toxicity of EE2 and depleted genetic variance for tolerance to this synthetic stressor.
Keywords
Animals, Breeding, Ethinyl Estradiol/toxicity, Rivers/chemistry, Salmonidae/physiology, Trout/physiology, Water Pollutants, Chemical/toxicity, Additive genetic variance, Chemical pollution, Embryo survival, Estrogen, Larval growth, Rapid evolution, Salmonidae
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation / Projects
Create date
20/12/2019 11:57
Last modification date
03/04/2020 6:19
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