Glucose metabolism links astroglial mitochondria to cannabinoid effects.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_E857C31CEC4B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Glucose metabolism links astroglial mitochondria to cannabinoid effects.
Journal
Nature
Author(s)
Jimenez-Blasco D., Busquets-Garcia A., Hebert-Chatelain E., Serrat R., Vicente-Gutierrez C., Ioannidou C., Gómez-Sotres P., Lopez-Fabuel I., Resch-Beusher M., Resel E., Arnouil D., Saraswat D., Varilh M., Cannich A., Julio-Kalajzic F., Bonilla-Del Río I., Almeida A., Puente N., Achicallende S., Lopez-Rodriguez M.L., Jollé C., Déglon N., Pellerin L., Josephine C., Bonvento G., Panatier A., Lutz B., Piazza P.V., Guzmán M., Bellocchio L., Bouzier-Sore A.K., Grandes P., Bolaños J.P., Marsicano G.
ISSN
1476-4687 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0028-0836
Publication state
Published
Issued date
07/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
583
Number
7817
Pages
603-608
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Astrocytes take up glucose from the bloodstream to provide energy to the brain, thereby allowing neuronal activity and behavioural responses <sup>1-5</sup> . By contrast, astrocytes are under neuronal control through specific neurotransmitter receptors <sup>5-7</sup> . However, whether the activation of astroglial receptors can directly regulate cellular glucose metabolism to eventually modulate behavioural responses is unclear. Here we show that activation of mouse astroglial type-1 cannabinoid receptors associated with mitochondrial membranes (mtCB <sub>1</sub> ) hampers the metabolism of glucose and the production of lactate in the brain, resulting in altered neuronal functions and, in turn, impaired behavioural responses in social interaction assays. Specifically, activation of astroglial mtCB <sub>1</sub> receptors reduces the phosphorylation of the mitochondrial complex I subunit NDUFS4, which decreases the stability and activity of complex I. This leads to a reduction in the generation of reactive oxygen species by astrocytes and affects the glycolytic production of lactate through the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 pathway, eventually resulting in neuronal redox stress and impairment of behavioural responses in social interaction assays. Genetic and pharmacological correction of each of these effects abolishes the effect of cannabinoid treatment on the observed behaviour. These findings suggest that mtCB <sub>1</sub> receptor signalling can directly regulate astroglial glucose metabolism to fine-tune neuronal activity and behaviour in mice.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/07/2020 11:25
Last modification date
31/07/2020 6:26
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