Non-enzymatic glycation of lipoprotein(a) in vitro and in vivo

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_E804113BD39A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Non-enzymatic glycation of lipoprotein(a) in vitro and in vivo
Journal
Atherosclerosis
Author(s)
Doucet  C., Huby  T., Ruiz  J., Chapman  M. J., Thillet  J.
ISSN
0021-9150
Publication state
Published
Issued date
11/1995
Volume
118
Number
1
Pages
135-43
Notes
96161416
0021-9150
Journal Article --- Old month value: Nov --- Old uritopublisher value: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=8579623
Abstract
Nonenzymatic glycation of lipoprotein may contribute to the premature atherogenesis of patients with diabetes mellitus by diverting lipoprotein catabolism from non-atherogenic to atherogenic pathways. It has been demonstrated that the proportion of apolipoprotein B-100 (apo B-100) in glycated form is significantly higher in diabetic patients than in non-diabetic controls, and equally that plasma lipoprotein(a) Lp(a) levels may be increased in diabetic patients. Consequently, we have evaluated the glycation of Lp(a) in vitro and in vivo, by use of a combination of m-aminophenylboronate affinity chromatography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for apo B-100 and Lp(a). In vitro studies were performed on normolipodemic plasma samples containing elevated concentrations of Lp(a). These studies establish that Lp(a) can be glycated in vitro in the presence of high concentrations of glucose, although to a lesser extent than low density lipoprotein (LDL) (15.8% +/- 4.4% and 30.2% +/- 5.4% (P = 0.0001) after a 48 h incubation at 37 degrees C, respectively). We have also shown that apo B-100 was more glycated than apo(a) in the Lp(a) particle. In vivo studies have shown that the percentage of glycated Lp(a) in diabetic patients was significantly higher than in the control population (2.8% +/- 1.07% versus 2.0% +/- 0.43%, P = 0.017). The level of glycated Lp(a) is also positively correlated with that of HbA1c in diabetic patients (r=0.6, P=0.002). Since our results show that Lp(a) is less susceptible to glycation than LDL, we speculate that glycation of LDL may be more relevant to the cardiovascular risk associated with this particle than with Lp(a).
Keywords
Apolipoproteins B/metabolism Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Glycosylation Human In Vitro Lipoprotein(a)/*metabolism Lipoproteins, LDL/metabolism Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
03/03/2008 15:15
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:10
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