Detection of Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia-like organisms on the ocular surface of children and adults from a trachoma-endemic region.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_E6405A1C1146
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Detection of Chlamydiaceae and Chlamydia-like organisms on the ocular surface of children and adults from a trachoma-endemic region.
Journal
Scientific reports
Author(s)
Ghasemian E., Inic-Kanada A., Collingro A., Tagini F., Stein E., Alchalabi H., Schuerer N., Keše D., Babiker B.E., Borel N., Greub G., Barisani-Asenbauer T.
ISSN
2045-2322 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2045-2322
Publication state
Published
Issued date
09/05/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
8
Number
1
Pages
7432
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Trachoma, the leading infectious cause of blindness, is caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), a bacterium of the phylum Chlamydiae. Recent investigations revealed the existence of additional families within the phylum Chlamydiae, also termed Chlamydia-like organisms (CLOs). In this study, the frequency of Ct and CLOs was examined in the eyes of healthy Sudanese (control) participants and those with trachoma (case). We tested 96 children (54 cases and 42 controls) and 93 adults (51 cases and 42 controls) using broad-range Chlamydiae and Ct-specific (omcB) real-time PCR. Samples positive by broad-range Chlamydiae testing were subjected to DNA sequencing. Overall Chlamydiae prevalence was 36%. Sequences corresponded to unclassified and classified Chlamydiae. Ct infection rate was significantly higher in children (31.5%) compared to adults (0%) with trachoma (p < 0.0001). In general, 21.5% of adults and 4.2% of children tested positive for CLOs (p = 0.0003). Our findings are consistent with previous investigations describing the central role of Ct in trachoma among children. This is the first study examining human eyes for the presence of CLOs. We found an age-dependent distribution of CLO DNA in human eyes with significantly higher positivity in adults. Further studies are needed to understand the impact of CLOs in trachoma pathogenicity and/or protection.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Child, Preschool, Chlamydia trachomatis/isolation & purification, Chlamydia trachomatis/physiology, Chlamydiaceae/isolation & purification, Chlamydiaceae/physiology, DNA, Bacterial/analysis, Endemic Diseases, Eye/microbiology, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Middle Aged, Phylogeny, Trachoma/epidemiology, Trachoma/microbiology, Young Adult
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
17/05/2018 19:33
Last modification date
14/10/2019 5:09
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