Sometimes needs change minds: Interests and values as determinants of attitudes towards state support for the self-employed during the COVID-19 crisis.

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State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_E61ADC9876C9
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Sometimes needs change minds: Interests and values as determinants of attitudes towards state support for the self-employed during the COVID-19 crisis.
Journal
Journal of European Social Policy
Author(s)
Bonoli G., Fossati F., Gandenberger M., Knotz C.M.
ISSN
0958-9287 (Print)
ISSN-L
0958-9287
Publication state
Published
Issued date
10/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
32
Number
4
Pages
407-421
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
This contribution investigates public attitudes toward providing financial help to the self-employed, a less well-researched area in the otherwise vibrant literature on welfare state attitudes. We analyse to what extent the self-employed themselves soften their general anti-statist stance in times of need, and how the public thinks about supporting those who usually tend to oppose government interventions. To answer these questions, we study public attitudes towards providing financial aid to the self-employed during the lockdowns adopted in response to the COVID pandemic in Switzerland, using survey data collected in the spring and in the autumn of 2020. The results show that most respondents favour the provision of financial support. In addition, the self-employed are the staunchest supporters of the more generous forms of help, like non-refundable payments. We conclude that, when exposed to significant economic risk, need and interests override ideological preferences for less state intervention.
Keywords
COVID-19, deservingness, pandemic, self-employed, welfare state
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
11/10/2022 12:24
Last modification date
26/11/2022 6:50
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