Epidemiology and new developments in the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_E5B357F34C75
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Epidemiology and new developments in the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection.
Journal
International Journal of Artificial Organs
Author(s)
Corvec S., Portillo M.E., Pasticci B.M., Borens O., Trampuz A.
ISSN
1724-6040 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0391-3988
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Volume
35
Number
10
Pages
923-934
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Although prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a rare event after arthroplasty, it represents a significant complication that is associated with high morbidity, need for complex treatment, and substantial healthcare costs. An accurate and rapid diagnosis of PJI is crucial for treatment success. Current diagnostic methods in PJI are insufficient with 10-30% false-negative cultures. Consequently, there is a need for research and development into new methods aimed at improving diagnostic accuracy and speed of detection. In this article, we review available conventional diagnostic methods for the diagnosis of PJI (laboratory markers, histopathology, synovial fluid and periprosthetic tissue cultures), new diagnostic methods (sonication of implants, specific and multiplex PCR, mass spectrometry) and innovative techniques under development (new laboratory markers, microcalorimetry, electrical method, reverse transcription [RT]-PCR, fluorescence in situ hybridization [FISH], biofilm microscopy, microarray identification, and serological tests). The results of highly sensitive diagnostic techniques with unknown specificity should be interpreted with caution. The organism identified by a new method may represent a real pathogen that was unrecognized by conventional diagnostic methods or contamination during specimen sampling, transportation, or processing. For accurate interpretation, additional studies are needed, which would evaluate the long-term outcome (usually >2 years) with or without antimicrobial treatment. It is expected that new rapid, accurate, and fully automatic diagnostic tests will be developed soon.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
22/01/2013 12:50
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:09
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