Sustained moderate reductions in arterial CO2 after brain trauma time-course of cerebral blood flow velocity and intracranial pressure.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_E5182093CBE4
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Sustained moderate reductions in arterial CO2 after brain trauma time-course of cerebral blood flow velocity and intracranial pressure.
Journal
Intensive Care Medicine
Author(s)
Steiner L.A., Balestreri M., Johnston A.J., Czosnyka M., Coles J.P., Chatfield D.A., Smielewski P., Pickard J.D., Menon D.K.
ISSN
0342-4642
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2004
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
30
Number
12
Pages
2180-2187
Language
english
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: In healthy volunteers cerebral blood flow starts to recover towards baseline within a few minutes of continued hyperventilation due to normalisation of perivascular pH. We investigated the time-course of changes in middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (FVm) and intracranial pressure (ICP) in head-injured patients during sustained moderate reductions in arterial partial pressure of CO(2) (PaCO(2)). DESIGN: Observational study. PATIENTS: Twenty-seven sedated, mechanically ventilated patients with severe head injury. INTERVENTIONS: Measurements were made during and after routine determination of CO(2)-reactivity: an acute 20% increase in respiratory minute volume was followed by a 10-min stabilisation period and 50 min of continued moderate hyperventilation at a constant PaCO(2) (>3.5 kPa). MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: FVm was monitored with transcranial Doppler, ICP was monitored with intraparenchymal probes. During the 50-min period with stable PaCO(2) FVm increased in 36% of patients. All other patients showed a decline in FVm over the same time period. Overall FVm recovery was -0.03+/-0.14%.min(-1). The time-course of ICP changes was significantly different from that of FVm, with ICP reaching its lowest value earlier than FVm (23+/-12 vs 37+/-20 min; P = 0.001) and returning more rapidly towards baseline than FVm (0.23+/-0.23 vs -0.03+/-0.14%.min(-1); P< 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Head-injured patients may adapt differently to hyperventilation than healthy volunteers. Potentially harmful reductions in cerebral blood flow may persist beyond the duration of useful ICP reduction.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Blood Flow Velocity, Blood Pressure, Brain Injuries/physiopathology, Carbon Dioxide/metabolism, Female, Glasgow Coma Scale, Humans, Hyperventilation/metabolism, Intracranial Pressure, Male, Middle Aged, Time Factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
16/12/2009 15:00
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:08
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