Professional support after partner loss: Likelihood and correlates of help-seeking behavior

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Version: Final published version
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_E440F3AF09A8
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Professional support after partner loss: Likelihood and correlates of help-seeking behavior
Journal
Frontiers in Psychology
Author(s)
Jopp Daniela, Lampraki Charikleia, Meystre Claudia, Znoj Hansjoerg, Brodbeck Jeannette
Publication state
Published
Issued date
23/11/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Abstract
Intimate partner loss in later life can be one of the most stressful events in adulthood. Individuals who struggle to adapt to the new life conditions may need support from a mental health professional. However, less is known about the likelihood to seek professional help after separation, divorce, or bereavement in later life and associated factors. This study investigated professional help-seeking (PHS) for partner loss after a long-term marriage in separated, divorced, and bereaved individuals and examined the extent to which specific person and event-related variables, as well as depressive symptoms, increase its likelihood. The data were derived from the LIVES “Intimate Partner Loss Study.” The self-administered questionnaires were completed by 388 adults. PHS was higher after separation (57%) and divorce (49%), compared to widowhood (18%). Higher likelihood of PHS was associated with separation and divorce, female gender, having someone to count on, loss unexpectedness, needing more time to overcome the loss, and more depressive symptoms. Informing individuals unlikely to seek help (e.g., males, bereaved, and individuals with no confidant) about PHS benefits may facilitate adaptation to partner loss.
Open Access
Yes
Create date
05/10/2017 11:18
Last modification date
26/11/2021 6:39
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