Recovering the Capacity to Live outside of a Psychiatric Hospital: Impact of a Specialized Inpatient Program.

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Version: Final published version
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_E4234460788C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Recovering the Capacity to Live outside of a Psychiatric Hospital: Impact of a Specialized Inpatient Program.
Journal
The Psychiatric quarterly
Author(s)
Lequin P., Golay P., Herrera F., Brisard M.A., Conus P.
ISSN
1573-6709 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0033-2720
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
92
Number
2
Pages
751-759
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Deinstitutionalization in psychiatry led to a decrease in hospital beds, short hospital admissions focussed on symptoms reduction, and the development of ambulatory care. However, the needs of patients who despite symptoms reduction do not display the minimal competencies to live alone or in a sheltered accommodation, are not met in such a context. They usually go through long admissions and fail to improve. In 2016, we implemented a new inpatient program focused on fostering the development of the competencies needed to adapt to living outside the hospital; the aim of this study was to evaluate if it lead to the resolution of these situations or in contrary if it turned into a long stay unit. 116 patients admitted to the program between 2016 and 2018 were included in the study. They were psychiatric inpatients who had no home, did not find a place in a sheltered accommodation and couldn't be discharged. In the majority of cases, the situation was resolved within 180 days and the majority of patients was referred to a sheltered accommodation. Functional and symptom levels improved significantly over time. A specific focus on restoring competencies to live outside of hospital allows complex patients to improve their functional level and to find a place to live in the community within a relatively short time. While deinstitutionalization has been beneficial to the vast majority of patients, denying the specific needs of a minority of patients leads to unnecessary long and inefficient hospital admissions.
Keywords
Deinstitutionalization, Housing, Severe mental illness, Social difficulties
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
17/09/2020 12:44
Last modification date
12/05/2021 5:34
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