Role of nuclear medicine during isolated limb perfusion

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_E2B7440D7CE1
Type
Inproceedings: an article in a conference proceedings.
Publication sub-type
Abstract (Abstract): shot summary in a article that contain essentials elements presented during a scientific conference, lecture or from a poster.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Role of nuclear medicine during isolated limb perfusion
Title of the conference
25th Annual Congress of the European-Association-of-Nuclear-Medicine (EANM)
Author(s)
Monteiro M. S., Figueiredo S. A., Noe C., Da Mota M., Cherbuin N., Boubaker A., Matter M., Prior J. O.
Address
Oct 27-31, 2012; Milan, Italy
ISBN
1619-7070
ISSN-L
1619-7070
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Volume
39
Series
European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Pages
S249
Language
english
Abstract
Aim:Isolated limb perfusion (ILP) is a technique consisting in administrating doses of chemotherapy up to 20 times higher than via systemic route in a limb affected by melanoma or sarcoma to maximise tumour reduction. ILP is performed in <50 centres worldwide and leads to partial or complete response, however without effect on overall survival. As an alternative to amputation, it improves patient quality of life. We report our >10-year single centre experience on the role of nuclear medicine in ILP. Material and method:From 2000 to 2012, we performed 77 ILP (45 women, 32 men; aged 62±16 years) for 49 melanoma (64%), 25 sarcoma (32%) and 3 others tumors (2 desmoid tumours and 1 aggressive fibromatosis) (3%). The affected limb vascularisation is isolated from the systemic circulation (SYS) using extracorporeal circulation, and chemotherapy (usually TNF and Melphalan) is administered. Peroperatively, limb isolation and eventual leakage from ILP to SYS are monitored by continuous measurement using a gamma-probe placed over the heart (150MBq of 99mTc-human serum albumin in ILP and 4MBq in SYS). The maximum acceptable leakage to the systemic circulation is 10% (maximum tolerated systemic TNF dose). Results:In total, 47 patients (61%) had positive leaks from the ILP to SYS of 4.1±14.5% (median 1% interquartile range 0.4% to 3.2%, range 0 to 100%) and 30 patients (39%) had negative leaks from the SYS to ILP of -0.9±1.2% (median -0.5%, interquartile range -0.8% to -0.2%, range -4.8% to -0.1%). In only 2 patients (2.6%), leaks >10% were observed leading to interrupting ILP. Conclusion:Nuclear Medicine has a crucial role for the safety and quality of ILP in monitoring leakage peroperatively and help deciding whether the procedure should be interrupted to minimize systemic toxicity.
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Create date
21/12/2012 11:28
Last modification date
20/08/2019 16:06
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