Three weeks of sprint interval training improved high-intensity cycling performance and limited ryanodine receptor modifications in recreationally active human subjects.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_DFC7FAB6C019
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Three weeks of sprint interval training improved high-intensity cycling performance and limited ryanodine receptor modifications in recreationally active human subjects.
Journal
European journal of applied physiology
Author(s)
Schlittler M., Neyroud D., Tanga C., Zanou N., Kamandulis S., Skurvydas A., Kayser B., Westerblad H., Place N., Andersson D.C.
ISSN
1439-6327 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1439-6319
Publication state
Published
Issued date
09/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
119
Number
9
Pages
1951-1958
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Mechanisms underlying the efficacy of sprint interval training (SIT) remain to be understood. We previously reported that an acute bout of SIT disrupts the integrity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca <sup>2+</sup> release channel, the ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1), in recreationally active human subjects. We here hypothesize that in addition to improving the exercise performance of recreationally active humans, a period of repeated SIT sessions would make the RyR1 protein less vulnerable and accelerate recovery of contractile function after a SIT session.
Eight recreationally active males participated in a 3-week SIT program consisting of nine sessions of four-six 30-s all-out cycling bouts with 4 min of rest between bouts.
Total work performed during a SIT session and maximal power (W <sub>max</sub> ) reached during an incremental cycling test were both increased by ~ 7.5% at the end of the training period (P < 0.05). Western blots performed on vastus lateralis muscle biopsies taken before, 1 h, 24 h and 72 h after SIT sessions in the untrained and trained state showed some protection against SIT-induced reduction of full-length RyR1 protein expression in the trained state. SIT-induced knee extensor force deficits were similar in the untrained and trained states, with a major reduction in voluntary and electrically evoked forces immediately and 1 h after SIT (P < 0.05), and recovery after 24 h.
Three weeks of SIT improves exercise performance and provides some protection against RyR1 modification, whereas it does not accelerate recovery of contractile function.
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological/physiology, Adult, Exercise/physiology, Exercise Test/methods, High-Intensity Interval Training/methods, Humans, Male, Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism, Muscle, Skeletal/physiology, Oxygen Consumption/physiology, Physical Endurance/physiology, Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel/metabolism, Young Adult, Physical exercise, Ryanodine receptor 1, Skeletal muscle, Sprint interval training
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
18/07/2019 18:11
Last modification date
22/01/2020 7:19
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