School-based interventions modestly increase physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness but are least effective for youth who need them most: an individual participant pooled analysis of 20 controlled trials.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_DF98A68FA3A7
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
School-based interventions modestly increase physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness but are least effective for youth who need them most: an individual participant pooled analysis of 20 controlled trials.
Journal
British journal of sports medicine
Author(s)
Hartwig T.B., Sanders T., Vasconcellos D., Noetel M., Parker P.D., Lubans D.R., Andrade S., Ávila-García M., Bartholomew J., Belton S., Brooks N.E., Bugge A., Cavero-Redondo I., Christiansen L.B., Cohen K., Coppinger T., Dyrstad S., Errisuriz V., Fairclough S., Gorely T., Javier Huertas-Delgado F., Issartel J., Kriemler S., Kvalø S.E., Marques-Vidal P., Martinez-Vizcaino V., Møller N.C., Moran C., Morris J., Nevill M., Ochoa-Avilés A., O'Leary M., Peralta L., Pfeiffer K.A., Puder J., Redondo-Tébar A., Robbins L.B., Sanchez-Lopez M., Tarp J., Taylor S., Tercedor P., Toftager M., Villa-González E., Wedderkopp N., Weston K.L., Yin Z., Zhixiong Z., Lonsdale C., Del Pozo Cruz B.
ISSN
1473-0480 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0306-3674
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
To determine if subpopulations of students benefit equally from school-based physical activity interventions in terms of cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity. To examine if physical activity intensity mediates improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness.
Pooled analysis of individual participant data from controlled trials that assessed the impact of school-based physical activity interventions on cardiorespiratory fitness and device-measured physical activity.
Data for 6621 children and adolescents aged 4-18 years from 20 trials were included.
Peak oxygen consumption (VO <sub>2Peak</sub> mL/kg/min) and minutes of moderate and vigorous physical activity.
Interventions modestly improved students' cardiorespiratory fitness by 0.47 mL/kg/min (95% CI 0.33 to 0.61), but the effects were not distributed equally across subpopulations. Girls and older students benefited less than boys and younger students, respectively. Students with lower levels of initial fitness, and those with higher levels of baseline physical activity benefitted more than those who were initially fitter and less active, respectively. Interventions had a modest positive effect on physical activity with approximately one additional minute per day of both moderate and vigorous physical activity. Changes in vigorous, but not moderate intensity, physical activity explained a small amount (~5%) of the intervention effect on cardiorespiratory fitness.
Future interventions should include targeted strategies to address the needs of girls and older students. Interventions may also be improved by promoting more vigorous intensity physical activity. Interventions could mitigate declining youth cardiorespiratory fitness, increase physical activity and promote cardiovascular health if they can be delivered equitably and their effects sustained at the population level.
Keywords
cardiorespiratory fitness, individual participant data (IPD), moderate to vigorous physical activity, peak oxygen consumption, school-based physical activity intervention, youth
Pubmed
Create date
26/01/2021 16:23
Last modification date
29/01/2021 7:26
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